Adam Crosswhite, Slave Escape with Entire Family

 This article was published in the Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky, 2009, University Press of Kentucky.

 

Crosswhite, Adam (b. October 17, 1799, Bourbon Co., Ky.; d. January 23, 1878, Marshall, Mich.). Adam Crosswhite was a fair-skinned mulatto slave from Bourbon Co. His father was a white slave owner named Powers, who was a half-brother of Miss Ann Crosswhite. Ownership shifted to Miss Crosswhite prior to her marriage to Ned Stone. In turn, Stone sold Adam Crosswhite for $200, and in 1819 Adam was traded to Francis Giltner, a planter in Bourbon Co. There, Adam married Sarah in a slave ceremony and raised four children. Before 1830, Francis Giltner moved the entire family and his slaves to Hunters Bottom in Carroll Co., Ky. along the Ohio River.

In August 1843, Adam learned that Francis Giltner planned to sell part of his family. Crosswhite sought help from the Underground Railroad organization in Madison, Ind. As runaway slaves, and after having two narrow escapes using the newly organized safe routes through Ind., the Crosswhites—Adam, Sarah, Benjamin, Johnson, and two girls. Another child was born in Michigan. The Crosswhites managed to escape to Marshall, a city in south central Mich. There, Adam maintained a low profile. He worked, built a cabin, and became accepted in the village.

In response to the increased number of runaway slaves through the 1840s, slave owners in the north central river counties and the Bluegrass of Ky. sought to recover their financial investments. In 1846, a coalition of slave owners met in Covington, Ky., and hired a spy to ferret out runaway slaves in southern Mich. In late fall 1846, this spy, who called himself Carpenter, arrived in Marshall and in Cass Co. Masquerading as an abolitionist from Worcester, Mass., he visited the homes of free people of color. The information he gathered led to two major raids by Kentuckians, the earliest at Marshall in Calhoun Co., and the second in Cass Co.

In December 1846, acting on sources gathered by the spy, a young attorney in Lexington, Ky., Francis Troutman, grandson of a former owner and nephew of Francis Giltner, came to Calhoun Co., Mich., posing as a schoolteacher seeking a place to settle. He hired local Deputy Sheriff Harvey Dixon to pose as a census taker to scout the Crosswhite family. On January 20, 1847, Troutman reappeared at Marshall with three other Kentuckians—William Franklin Ford, David Giltner, and James S. Lee—- and, accompanied by Deputy Sheriff Dixon, went to the Crosswhite cabin. There they attempted to capture Adam, but he and his son Johnson fled through a cornfield; Crosswhite accompanied Deputy Sheriff Dixon to secure counsel, and Troutman stayed in the Crosswhite cabin with drawn pistol as several neighbors attempted to enter the house, one of whom, a Mr. Hackett, was assaulted by Troutman.

When Dixon returned, he charged Troutman with assault and battery on Hackett and with trespassing and housebreaking. Troutman paid $100 in fines the next day in the local court before Judge Randall Hobart. Meanwhile, the townspeople hid the Crosswhite family in the attic of George Ingersoll’s mill. Isaac Jacobs, the hostler at the Marshall House, hired a team and covered wagon and,on the night of January 27, Ingersoll and Asa B. Cook drove the Crosswhite family to Jackson where they boarded a train to Detroit. George De Baptiste, the former Underground Railroad leader at Madison, Ind., met the Crosswhites in Detroit and took them into Canada.

The Kentuckians were furious, and several slave owner meetings were held. Citizens of Trimble and Carroll counties, led by Moses Hoagland of Hunters Bottom, met at Kings Tavern on February 10 and drew up three resolutions demanding that the Ky. legislature call upon its U.S. senators and congressmen to pass federal legislation giving slave owners redress and imprisoning and fining those who enticed, harbored, or aided runaway slaves.

By June 1847, Mich. newspapers along the southern tier were equally outraged that Ky. posses were seizing fugitives in a free state whose citizens detested slavery. In August 1847, a large Ky. raid led by Boone Co. (Ky.) slave owners George W. Brazier and Benjamin Stevens was repulsed from Cass Co. after attempting to recapture several former slaves.

The legislative wheels were set in motion. Joseph Underwood’s report and resolutions from the Ky. legislature were sent to the U.S. Senate on December 20, 1847 and, in May 1848, Senator Andrew P. Butler of S.C. printed his report favoring strong federal sanctions against those aiding runaway slaves; 10,000 copies were distributed. Momentum built for passage of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act that made it mandatory for U.S.  marshals to seize runaway slaves, for representatives of the slave owner to identify the runaways, and for severe fines to be levied on all those aiding and harboring fugitive slaves. Henry Clay, a personal friend of Francis Giltner, proposed a clause mandating restitution of property to southerners reclaiming runaway slaves.

Attorney Francis Troutman returned to Mich. in May 1848 to gather evidence and press charges against those who aided the Crosswhite family. On June 1, 1848, in Detroit, Justice McLane of the federal bench heard Giltner vs. Gorham et al. McLane charged the jury with ignoring their attitude toward slavery and deciding the case based only on the plaintiffs right to the services of the fugitives, and therefore, the right to obtain financial redress. The first trial jury hung and was discharged on June 12. A second trial was held and the jury awarded Giltner $1,926 in damages and heavy court costs, for a total of about $4,500. Zachariah Chandler, a leading antislavery Whig in Detroit, paid the greater part of the fine. Juryman Philo Dibble, a resident of Marshall, was publicly chastised from the pulpit by his Presbyterian minister for his participation in the verdict.

Northern reaction to passage of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act was swift. By 1854, Ind. Mich., and Ohio had formed significant Republican parties that were obtaining antislavery majorities in their state legislative bodies, sending anti-slave congressmen and senators to Washington, and, by 1860, giving Abraham Lincoln the presidential candidacy.

The Crosswhite family returned to Marshall, Mich., after the Civil War; in 1878, Adam Crosswhite died and was buried in the Oakridge Cemetery in that city. In 1923, Michigan erected a bronze marker set in a stone boulder near the old Crosswhite cabin. The marker commemorates the runaway slave from Carroll Co., Ky., and the role of the people of Marshall in repulsing the Ky. posse.

Battle Creek Enquirer, July 14, 1907, January 28, 1929, July 3, 1930, April 1960.

Battle Creek, Michigan, Journal, 1927.

Battle Creek, Michigan, Tribune, January 20, 1847.

Crosswhite File, Calhoun Co., Mich., Public Library.

The Enquirer and Evening News of Battle Creek, Michigan, February 18, 1923, February 11, 1945, February 17, 1974.

Giltner vs. Gorham et al; Case No. 5,453, Circuit Court D, Michigan [114 McLean 402: 6 West Law J, 491].

Fuller, George N. ed. Michigan: A Centennial History of the State and Its People. Chicago: Lewis Publishing Co, 1939.

Gara, Larry. The Liberty Line, University of Kentucky Press. 1961.

Gardner, History of Calhoun County, Michigan, 1913.

History of Calhoun County, Michigan, L. H. Everts & Co., Philadelphia, 1877.

Journal of the (Ky.) House of Representatives, (February 13, 1847): 338–41.

Michigan History, 53, no. 2 (1969): 131–43.

20th Congress, First Session [Senate] Ref. Com. No. 143.

The Weekly Commonwealth, Frankfort, Ky., February 23, 1847.

Diane Perrine Coon

 

 

Richard Daly, Underground Railroad Conductor, Escape to Canada

 This article was published in the Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky, 2009, University Press of Kentucky.

 

Richard Daly line drawing from Detroit Sunday News-Tribune Jul 22, 1894Daly, Richard (date and place of birth unknown), The birthplace and birth date of Richard Daly, like those of many Ky. slaves, are unknown, but he was still alive in 1894 in Windsor, Canada, when interviewed by a reporter for a Detroit, Mich., newspaper. Richard Daly’s four children were born between 1840 and 1850 in Hunter’s Bottom, in Carroll Co., Ky. His oldest girl, Mary, was listed as being age seventeen in the 1860 Detroit census.

In the 1850s, Richard, his brother, Joe Daly, and Tom Owen were slaves owned by Samuel Fearn Sr. at Hunter’s Bottom, Ky. The Fearn family came to Ky. from Buckingham Co., Va. In 1803, Samuel Fearn (1766–1828) and his oldest son George (1796–1869) came to Hunter’s Bottom, a ten-mile stretch of Ohio River bottomland between Canip and Locust creeks. The Fearns had first moved to Bourbon Co. in Ky., but encountering some kind of land interference issues there, proceeded north.

Samuel Fearn, the family’s fourth child, was born at Hunter’s Bottom in 1806 and married Elizabeth Owen in 1826. George and Samuel Fearn together owned about 1,000 acres along the banks of the Ohio River, straddling the Carroll and Trimble county line, but Samuel Fearn’s main income came from his gristmill and packet steamship businesses in Milton, on the Ky. side of the Ohio River opposite Madison, Ind. He also purchased timberland in Jackson Co., Ind., on the White River. George Fearn speculated in land along the wharf area in Madison and along the Ind. shoreline on the east side of Madison. The two Fearn brothers were quite wealthy.

Sam Fearn's home c. 1910 Hunters Bottom
Sam Fearn’s plantation house at Hunter’s Bottom, Kentucky

Samuel Fearn had three slaves; his brother George, a bachelor, owned four or five slaves. The Fearn family history states that George Fearn had become an ardent Methodist and emancipated all of his slaves in his will. George was so pro-Union and so openly opposed to slavery that horses were stolen from his farm in a targeted attack by Confederate raiders during the Civil War.

In his 1894 interview, Richard Daly referred to Samuel and George Fearn as “kind,” and it appeared that Richard had many advantages over other slaves in the region. He lived in a brick house behind the main Samuel Fearn homestead and was permitted to take produce to market in Madison, in order to earn money to purchase his freedom. In fact, Samuel Fearn had set an extremely low purchase price, $100, for Richard’s freedom , with comparable prices for slaves of Richard’s age and ability rising well above $800-$900. Richard claimed that by 1856 he had already saved $100 “in his pocket.” Fearn, like many of the Hunter’s Bottom slave owners, allowed frequent conjugal visits by Richard to his wife Kitty, a house servant owned by Moses Hoagland who lived east of the Fearns along the Ohio River toward Carrollton, Ky. Richard and Kitty had four living children that by law and custom were owned by Moses Hoagland.

Eagle Hollow Vertical
Eagle Hollow on Indiana side of Ohio River

But the most unusual fact about Richard Daly was that he had worked actively in the Underground Railroad (UGRR) for some years. He stated that he had ferried thirty fugitive slaves across the Ohio River before 1856. He would meet the fugitive slaves two miles above Milton and row them across in his small boat. During the 1850s, this route through Eagle Hollow in Carroll Co., Ky., was one of the most active crossing points on the Ohio River between Cincinnati, Ohio, and Louisville, Ky. Richard’s method of signaling his friend, a white leader of the UGRR (probably John Carr) was also highly unusual. Richard said that he would row into the middle of the Ohio River and shoot a revolver in the air. The UGRR agent would then shoot his revolver in response. By the time Richard arrived at the Ind. shore, his white friend would be ready and take charge of the runaways.

It was well known that Samuel Fearn enjoyed hunting and had several hunting dogs always running through the house and farm. But for a slave to have access to a revolver and ammunition is remarkable. Further, the sound of gunshots in the middle of the Ohio River at night carried to both shores. If the Indiana UGRR agent heard it, the Fearns would have heard it also. Therefore, it has been suggested locally that the Fearn brothers were tacitly, if not actively, approving Richard’s aiding of runaway slaves.

Richard said that he was happy in his circumstances and had no plans to escape, but then his wife Kitty unexpectedly died. Richard was concerned about his children and asked Mrs. Hoagland (Sarah Payne of Lexington, Ky.) to keep them in Hunter’s Bottom, and she agreed. However, a short time later, the Hoagland daughter married a doctor and moved to Louisville and asked for Mary, the oldest Daly girl, to go with her permanently. When Richard learned his family was to be separated, he went that same night to pick up all four children. They crossed the Ohio River and took the Madison UGRR route north through Ind. Richard said that they rode horses northward successively accompanied by two sets of UGRR agents, one from dark to midnight and another from midnight to dawn. The Daly family slept in various farmhouses until they reached Mich. There, they boarded the Michigan Central Railroad to Detroit, and then crossed over the ferry to Windsor, Canada.

In Canada, Richard worked feeding cattle for a man named Hiram Walker, an exporter of livestock to Great Britain from a farm located along the Detroit River. Daly said that he had crossed the Atlantic Ocean several times with these shipments. At some point, Richard married a second time. In 1894, three of the children who escaped with him were living in Detroit, and one child had died in Windsor.

Fearn Hill enhanced, hunters bottom
George Fearn’s Fearn Hill Plantation at Hunter’s Bottom Kentucky

Apparently Joe Daly and Tom Owen continued to live with Samuel Fearn at Hunter’s Bottom even after the Thirteenth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution freed all slaves. When George Fearn died in 1869 he left Fearn Hill, his antebellum home, to his nephew, George Fearn. The emancipation clause was still in George’s will, but it was moot since his slaves were already free by law.

Blassingame, John W. ed. Slave Testimony. Baton Rouge, La.: Louisiana State University Press, 1977.

Coon, Diane Perrine, “Southeastern Indiana’s Underground Railroad Routes and Operations,” TM, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, and “Chapman Harris and the St. Paul’s Baptist Church, Madison, Indiana,” for University of Louisville graduate program.

Emma McClaran Fearn family Bible in possession of Larry Douglas Smith of Louisville, Ky.

Smith, Larry Douglas, “The Fearns of Hunters Bottom, Kentucky,” TM at Kentucky Historical Society.

Interview with Richard Daly, 1894, Detroit Sunday News Tribune, Michigan State Library Newspaper Project.

Windsor, Ontario, Canada, 1864 Census.

Diane Perrine Coon

 

Emancipationists in Northern Kentucky

 This article was published in the Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky, 2009, University Press of Kentucky.

 

Emancipationists. Between 1790 and 1850, Kentuckians developed two quite different concepts, constitutional emancipation and gradual emancipation, concerning how to abolish slavery. During the first decades of Ky. statehood, constitutional emancipation formed the conceptual basis for emancipationist’s antislavery political actions. These early antislavery people tried to prevent Ky. from becoming a slave state, and once the 1799 state constitution legalized slavery, they attempted to repeal that part of it. This movement was most closely identified with the Reverend David Rice and several other Baptist, Methodist, and Presbyterian preachers and churchmen.

Constitutional emancipation was the path that Northern states chose in eliminating slavery. In some New England states, the abolition of slavery took place as outright bans—Vt. (1777), Mass. (1780), and N.H. (1784)–or in the form of gradual emancipation codified by state constitutions in R.I., N.Y., Pa., Conn., and eventually N. J. The major unresolved issues in the North were the legal status of a slave who moved into or fled from a slave state into a free state and whether or not to grant full citizenship to free people of color. As settlers from New England and Pa. flooded into Northern Kentucky, they brought the experience of having lived in states that had enacted constitutional emancipation.

In Southern states, where slavery had become embedded as an institution, and where slaves had the status of private property, emancipation took place through a legal process called manumission in which the individual slave owner could free slaves from bondage through a will or through a declaration in a local court. The counties that were formed in Ky during the state’s early years tended to enshrine the principle of private ownership of slaves. Many counties in Ky. required that a slaveholder or an administrator of an estate post a bond or provide sufficient financial resources, such as land or money, to avoid making a freed black a pauper dependent on the county. The Quakers, some Presbyterians, and Separate Baptists were active in N.C., Tenn., and parts of Ga. in creating manumission societies, dedicated to promoting, and in fact, purchasing families of slaves in order to free them from bondage. As settlers from these regions came into and through Ky., a small number of such manumission societies were established.

Some slaveholders in Ky. believed slavery to be evil but also regarded their slaves as prized private property. Generally, these slaveholders applauded the economic benefits of emancipation accruing to white landowners but also feared that emancipation might produce large numbers of freedmen living in Ky. Gradual emancipationists believed that slavery would be eliminated over time as slave owners of their own volition freed existing slaves through legal manumission. One form of gradual emancipation, publicized by James G. Birney and Cassius Clay, emphasized that slavery impeded economic development in Ky. They contrasted the booming economies of Ohio and Ind. with that of Ky. to prove their point. These arguments were meant to persuade slave owners to emancipate their slaves. In any case, gradual emancipationists tended to believe that slaveholders should be compensated for the loss of their property, if, at some point, slaves were freed by action of the state.

Abolitionists, by contrast, advocated eliminating the institution of slavery without compensation to slave owners. In early Ky., both constitutional and gradual emancipationists used the term abolition when advocating an end to slavery ; however by 1850, abolition referred only to those who favored immediate emancipation in the South.

Slavery and emancipation proved difficult topics for a number of Christian denominations. For the Baptists in 1803–1806, the issue came to a head at Mt. Sterling, Ky., in the person of David Barrow, a minister in the Separate Baptist tradition who served Goshen, Lulbegrud, and Mt. Sterling churches. Through political pressure from the Regular Baptists of the Elkhorn Baptist Association and their fledgling Bracken Baptist Association, David Barrow was expelled from the North District Baptist Association in 1806, for advocating the gradual emancipation of slaves and eventual abolition itself. Barrow not only preached continuously against slavery, but he published British Baptist Thomas Clarkson’s Essay on Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species, a 1785 treatise that greatly influenced U.S. abolitionists. Barrow himself wrote Involuntary, Unmerited, Perpetual, Absolute, Hereditary Slavery Examined on the Principles of Nature, Reason, Justice, Policy and Scripture that was printed in 1808 by John Bradford at Lexington, Ky. That same year, Barrow joined Carter Tarrant and founded the Baptized Licking-Locust Association, Friends of Humanity, also known as the Emancipation Baptists.

The Baptized Licking-Locust Association, Friends of Humanity, in Ky. included: Bracken, Gilgal, and Licking Locust Baptist churches from the Bracken Baptist Association, Lawrence Creek Baptist Church from Mason Co., Bethel and Mt. Sterling Baptist churches from the North District Baptist Association, New Hope Baptist Church from Woodford Co. with members from the original Clear Creek and Hillsboro Baptist churches, and Bullskin Baptist Church from Shelby Co.

The Emancipation Baptists acted chiefly in the traditional method of other Baptist Associations with messengers, queries, reports, and periodic meetings and preaching. It was not a political party. However, these same Kentuckians were influenced by the creation in 1814 of the Tenn. Manumission Society, with Charles Osborn and John Rankin as charter members, and the creation of the American Emancipation Society. The Ky. antislavery people began to think about political action to repeal the slavery clause in their constitution and moral-ethical action by individual slave owners to emancipate their slaves in their wills.

In 1821, Carter Tarrant and David Barrow formed the Ky. Abolition Society. At that time, Tarrant was living in Carrollton, Ky. The Ky. Abolition Society included the Baptist churches from the Emancipationist Baptists Tarrant had helped to form and a few preachers and elders from the Methodist and Presbyterian denominations. Three of these were the Reverends Alexander, Moses Edwards, and John Mahan; twenty-one ordained members also belonged to the Ky. Abolition Society. At its peak, however, the statewide organization never claimed more than 200 members.

The Maysville Abolition Society, led by Amos Corwine Jr., was active during this period. A small group was located at Shelbyville, Ky., and another at Frankfort, Ky., hosted the statewide organizing meeting. Although there was clearly an antislavery group at Louisville, Ky., led chiefly by Presbyterian and Unitarian ministers, there is no indication that they were part of the Ky. Abolition Society.

Lucien Rule cited Lyman Beecher, Gideon Blackburn, John Dickey, Henry Little, Samuel Shannon, and Parson John Todd as early influential antislavery Presbyterian preachers in Northern Kentucky and Southern Ind. The Scots Coventer, Seceder, and Associate Reformed Presbyterians led by John Anderson, Andrew Fulton, and George Shannon settled on the Ind. side of the Ohio River, north and west of Madison. These Scots congregations formed early aid to fugitive slaves all along the Ohio River and up into central Ind.

John Finley Crowe, a student at Transylvania University in Lexington, Ky., was charged with editing a flagship newspaper for the Ky. Abolition Society, the Abolition and Intelligence Messenger. Crowe began the publication in Lexington. He then moved to Shelbyville, Ky., where he published his paper a few months advocating the repeal of Kentucky’s slave laws. Crowe then proceeded to seminary, ordination, and in 1825, began his first church assignment at Vernon, Ind. He later achieved prominence as the first president of Hanover College at Madison, Ind., and as head of the Ind. Old School Presbyterian Colonization Society.

The enthusiasm for emancipation of slaves soon began spread through the mid-South. In 1823, Tenn. reported twenty-five manumission societies, mostly in the eastern part of the state. In 1823, N.C. declared fifty societies active at the national Emancipation Society Meeting at Philadelphia, Pa. Between 1823 and 1828, representatives from Baltimore, Md., New England, and Philadelphia met annually. The East Tenn. groups usually sent delegates, but there is no evidence of Ky. having been represented at the national level.

A number of slave owners manumitted their slaves. However, in the entire period from 1799 to 1868, slaveholders in Bracken Co., Ky., for instance, filed only 156 emancipation records in the courthouse, 14 of them by Arthur Thome of Augusta, Ky., in 1834–1836. In Ky. in 1847, in Owen Co., Susan Herndon Rogers freed the ten slaves of the Locust family and gave them 403 acres known as Free Station, or Mountain Island. Susan’s brother, James Herndon, executed a bond in 1853 for $21,000 in order to have his twenty-two slaves manumitted. James Herndon’s manumitted slaves, the Carroll, Smith, and Vinegar families, divided 125 acres at Mountain Island. Yet, actions such as these hardly made a dent in the huge numbers of slaves pouring into Ky. from the Carolinas, Md., and Va. . By 1827, the emancipation movement ran out of steam as the leaders died off or moved away, and the impact of moral persuasion proved anemic.

Into this intellectual vacuum, the faculty at the Danville Presbyterian Seminary led by the Reverend Dr. Robert J. Breckinridge, with the aid of his brother William J. Breckinridge, an influential Louisville minister, steered the antislavery movement toward a conservative approach that linked gradual emancipation with the concept of colonization, sending freed blacks back to Africa. The American Colonization Society, founded in 1810, was developed chiefly as a method of ridding the nation of its free people of color and was not originally conceived as a tactic to eliminate slavery from the South. In fact, it was the opposite. The manumission movement, adopted by many Presbyterians and Methodists in the early years of Ky. statehood, had been all too productive; hundreds of free blacks now populated southern cities and northern rural communities. To the slave owner, a free black living in a community where there were slaves represented an unnecessary tension, a temptation for slaves to become dissatisfied with their bondage. The Nat Turner Rebellion of 1831 in Va. exacerbated all the latent fears of a tiny slaveholding minority controlling the daily movements of millions of black slaves. One result was the immediate imposition of harsh laws against free people of color throughout the South and the Ohio River valley. The second result was that the antislavery leadership within the Presbyterians, Methodists, and many forms of Baptists, vigorously adopted the tenets and the tactics of the colonization movement. Sending free blacks to Africa was considered the ultimate solution. At first, colonizationists, with Ky. statesman Henry Clay as their leader and the federal government and wealthy individuals backing the movement, purchased large tracts of land on the coast of Africa, lined up ships to transport former slaves to Liberia, and convinced some slave owners to follow their precepts in educating slaves to Christianize their new African homelands. By 1849, it became evident that free people of color did not want to go to Africa. Fewer than 650 former Ky. slaves ever went to Liberia and some later returned. The colonization-emancipationists were faced with 250,000 Ky. slaves who intended to stay in the U.S.

As the Ky. constitutional convention in October 1849 approached, the anti-slavery forces in the state made a determined assault on slavery. A statewide emancipation convention was scheduled for April 1849 in Frankfort, Ky. Leading up to this meeting, the abolitionists in Ky., led by John G. Fee from Lewis and Bracken Cos., demanded non-importation of slaves and called upon the Ky. Legislature to emancipate slaves and grant them status as free citizens. The colonizationists, led by Robert J. Breckinridge, William Breckinridge, Henry Clay, and John R. Young, backed a gradual emancipation plan by which slave owners would pay for the transportation costs to send freed slaves to Africa instead of paying county and state taxes on their slave property. The April showdown was a disaster. The abolitionist voices championed by Fee and the colonization forces championed by the Breckinridges could not find common ground, and a weakened plank highlighting gradual emancipation with immediate colonization of freed blacks was finally hammered out to no one’s satisfaction. Meanwhile the pro-slavery leaders, John Breckinridge and Robert Wycliffe, and others were courting delegates to the October convention labeling all antislavery people as radical abolitionists. They reminded voters of the August 1848 Doyle armed slave revolt affecting Lexington and Bracken Co. in Ky. and other slave revolts in the South. The scare tactics worked to perfection, and the antislavery people were routed badly. Statewide, only in Campbell Co., with the election of Ira Root, and in Knox and Harlan counties, with Silas Woodson’s election, were emancipationists successful in electing delegates to the constitutional convention.

Emboldened by the political disarray among antislavery parties, the Ky. Legislature moved quickly to repeal the non-importation of slaves act of 1833, and the 1850 Ky. constitution squeezed the economic noose around free people of color, and constricted emancipation requirements, demanding that any freed slave immediately leave the state thereby clearly delineating Ky.’s status as a slave state.

During the early 1840s at Lane Seminary in Cincinnati, Ohio, John G. Fee not only turned his back on his father’s slave holdings and his Bracken Co. neighbors’ approval of the peculiar institution, but Fee moved all the way to embrace the concept of the immediate abolition of slavery. Fee spent the next few years searching for a method of challenging slavery on southern soil. At first, he worked within the New School Presbyterians, founding churches in Ky. in Lewis and Bracken counties; but the New School Synod disciplined him for his virulent antislavery activities. Fee had already moved toward an anti-caste, antislavery position, and gradually moved beyond any attachment to a denomination. And, in fact, he influenced the Bracken and Lewis county churches to become part of the Free Church movement.

Fee worked with Simeon S. Jocelyn, Amos Phelps, Lewis Tappan, and George Whipple of the American Missionary Association to develop a colporteur system, bringing northern antislavery preachers and dedicated lay people to distribute Bibles, antislavery literature, and anti-caste congregation development into the mid-South, particularly into Madison Co., Ky. Greatly influenced by Eli Thayer and John C. Underwood’s concepts of Northern Emigrant Communities in the upper South, Fee decided in 1858 to model an egalitarian community at Berea, Ky., on lands donated by Cassius M. Clay. Fee recruited religious and educators but never had the economic managerial expertise of the similar Ceredo community formed in W.Va. Both as an educator and symbol, Fee stands alone in Ky.’s antislavery history.

Most historians acclaim John G. Fee’s courage at Berea, where former slaves and white men could form a community, for his work in educating men, women, and children in Ky. at Camp Nelson in Garrard Co. and at Berea. But most historians also find Fee irrelevant to the attitudes and actions taken by the overwhelming numbers of Kentuckians during the 1860s. John G. Fee, the last emancipationist, neither convinced slave owners to give up their slaves nor yeomen to embrace blacks as fellow citizens. Consequently, Ky. would move into and through the Civil War as a slave state.

Barrow, David. Involuntary, Unmerited, Perpetual, Absolute, Hereditary Slavery Examined on the Principles of Nature, Reason, Justice, Policy, and Scripture, Lexington, Ky.: Bradford Printers, 1808.

Bland, Ballard. Address to the People of Kentucky on the Subject of Emancipation, April 1848.

Bland, Ballard, and John Speed, et al. Slave Emancipation in Kentucky, Bland Ballard, 1849.

Dumond, Dwight Lowell. Antislavery, The Crusade for Freedom in America, New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 1961.

Howard, Victor B. The Evangelical War against Slavery and Caste, the Life and Times of John G. Fee, Selinsgrove, Pa.: Susquehanna University Press, 1996.

Martin, Asa Earl. “Pioneer Antislavery Press,” Missouri Valley Historical Review, 2 (March 1916): 510–528.

Miller, Carolyn R., comp. African American Bracken County Kentucky 1797–1999, Brooksville, Ky.: Bracken County Historical Society, 1999.

____________________  Slavery in Newsprint, Central Ohio River Borderlands, 1840–1859. Brooksville, Ky.: Bracken County Historical Society; 2003.

Tallant, Harold D. Evil Necessity, Slavery and Political Culture in Antebellum Kentucky, Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky, 2003.

Tenkotte, Paul A. “Rival Cities to Suburbs: Covington and Newport, Kentucky, 1790–1890.” Ph.D. diss., University of Cincinnati, 1989.

Turner, Wallace B. “Abolitionism in Kentucky,” RKHS, 69 (October 1971): 319–338.

 

Diane Perrine Coon

 

 

Miles Withers Conway, Pioneer Mason County, Kentucky

The following article was published in the Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky, 2009, University Press of Kentucky

Conway, Miles Withers (b. 1752, Stafford Co, Va.; d. February 28, 1822, Mason Co., Ky.). Sometime before 1786, Miles Withers Conway and his brother, John (1757–1842), settled in Mason Co., Ky. Unlike most of the early surveyors in Ky., Miles Conway and fellow pioneer, Henry Lee, were familiar with the use of new surveyor’s instruments, such as quadrants and transits with the mathematical underpinnings of professional surveying.

Miles W. and John Conway were the sons of Captain Withers Conway and Dulcibella Bunbury of Stafford Co., Va. The Bunbury family was socially well connected but improvident. The Conway family was descended from Dennis Conway, an early settler (1665) of Va’s Great Wiccomico River, and his fifth son, Christopher Conway, who married Sarah Withers, one of the wealthiest women living in the American colonies.

Although Miles inherited 300 acres in northeastern Fauquier Co., Va., from his grandmother, Sarah Withers Conway, the family’s main fortune, as well as 1,350 acres of Stafford Co., Va., lands, were entailed to the Withers family’s male heir in England upon Sarah Withers Conway’s death. Powerful landed gentry in Va., such as Augustine Washington and Col. Henry Fitzhugh, wanted the Withers family’s land, but Sarah refused to vacate her plantation. Fitzhugh called her “that old hag,” but Sarah apparently outlived them all, including her own son, Capt. Withers Conway, because when she died at age ninety, she was still residing on her plantation’s lands.

Captain Withers Conway, Miles Conway’s father, served as captain in the Va. Militia during the French and Indian War and for his military service was entitled to land warrants in Ky. The DAR lists Miles Conway and his brother, John Conway as Revolutionary War soldiers from Spottsylvania, Va. Somehow, the Conway brothers became friendly with the sizeable Berry family clan in Frederick Co., Va. John Conway married Mary (Mollie) Berry. and Miles married Susannah, who was probably Mary Berry’s sister. The Conway brothers’ father-in-law was Joseph Berry, who was married to Mary Fairfax Berry, from the well-connected Fairfax family of Va.

In 1787, Miles Conway filed a survey and patent in his name, using a 1785 Fincastle Co., Va., treasury warrant from Joseph Berry for 637.5 acres along the Kentucky River in what was then Fayette Co., Ky. From the transaction sequence on these lands, it appears that this might have been a dowry or a wedding gift from Joseph Berry to his son-in-law Miles W. Conway. That land was not sold until after the Miles Withers Conway’s estate was settled in 1831, and by then, at least thirty acres from the original tract was located in Owen Co., Ky.

In 1786, Miles Conway purchased several in-lots and became a trustee of the town of Washington, Ky., in Mason Co. Joseph Berry owned two houses down the street. Miles soon began work as a surveyor.  Miles’s brother, John Conway, meantime, had purchased land along the Mill Creek southeast of the town of Washington with two of the six Berry families then residing in Mason Co.

Miles Conway fit easily into the class of people who became magistrates in Mason Co. He served on the first court as a gentleman justice, and, in August 1786, became district commissioner of the western side of Mason Co. Conway platted the town of Mayslick, Ky. and was called upon by the Va. courts to resurvey disputed earlier land claims. Miles was elected sheriff of Mason Co. in 1790. He had the dubious distinction of serving a warrant issued in Bourbon Co., Ky., for breach of contract and non-payment of debt on Simon Kenton, the famed pioneer and Indian fighter who was, at the time, a Major in the local militia. Using uncommon judicial restraint, Miles, as the arresting sheriff, set a parole perimeter wherein Kenton was to stay. The ten-mile diameter of the parole perimeter included the taverns located in Limestone, Ky., (Maysville), Kenton’s house, and Kenton’s favorite hunting and fishing spots. Upon such good and popular judgment, Miles was re-elected sheriff in 1792 and as a delegate from Mason Co. to the state constitutional convention at Danville, Ky., in the same year. At Danville, this slaveholder from a slaveholding Va. family did a surprising thing. He voted with the seven preachers present to strike Article IX of the proposed constitution. Although not going so far as to institutionalize slavery in Ky., Article IX permitted slaves to be brought into the state with their masters, and it provided for local governments to regulate slaves within their jurisdictions. The article passed over the raised objections, and Miles, in the end, signed the first Ky. Constitution. The 1795 Mason Co. tax list showed Miles owning six slaves, seven horses, and twenty cattle.

In December 1802, Miles W. Conway and Henry Lee were appointed associate judges to the circuit court in Ky. Both men were well acquainted with the land interference and criminal mischief cases that dominated early Ky. court dockets; thus they were uniquely qualified to assess many overlapping claims brought into their respective courts.

Sometime between 1802 and 1805, Miles Withers Conway wrote a Treatise on Practical Surveying based on Robert Gibson’s Treatise on Surveying, a two-volume text that used English land claims in Northern Ireland for its worked examples; the second volume was entirely given over to log tables, sine, cosine, and tangent tables. Gibson’s first editions were printed in London, England. Joseph and James Cruckshank of Philadelphia, Pa., printed the fourth edition in 1785. Miles W. Conway used Gibson’s seventh edition of 1794, also printed in Philadelphia, as the guidebook for his own treatise.

In May 1805, Miles Conway took a simplified version of his earlier treatise to Thomas Tunstall, Clerk of the U.S. District Court, where Conway cited his publication as being “an act for the encouraging of learning by securing the copies of Maps, Charts and Books to the authors and proprietors or such copies during the time therein mentioned.” By this action, Conway had applied a very early copyright protection for his surveying book.

Daniel Bradford, son of John Bradford, the pioneering editor of Ky.’s first newspaper, the Kentucky Gazette, published Conway’s book in 1807 at Lexington, Ky. Its full title was: Geodosia, or a Treatise of Practical Surveying, wherein Several Things that Are Useful and Necessary in that Art are Considered and Explained, particularly several Very Consise Methods for Determining the Areas of Surveys by Calculations in Different Forms, and several Different Tables Adapted for that Purpose, Made for the Use of the Western Surveyors in Particular, or May be Useful to Any Other. Recognizing that few frontiersmen in America had a sufficient knowledge of math or the proper surveying instruments to apply Gibson or John Love’s more exacting scientific surveying principles directly, Conway emphasized, in his treatise, a method called Latitude and Departures. Applicable chiefly to plane surfaces, this method required a compass reading of latitude and then the establishing of a grid of measurements of deviations from that latitude, by use of a compass ring and simple calculations.

Obviously written to satisfy basic surveying in wilderness areas, Conway’s book had only sixty-four pages and is 4¾ inches by 7⅞ inches, easily portable in a saddlebag, or in the inside pocket of a greatcoat or hunting jacket. All examples given in the book were very practical and taken directly from Miles Conway’s experiences surveying in Ky.

Conway died in 1822 and is buried in Mason County.

Conway, Miles W. Geodosia, or a Treatise of Practical Surveying. Lexington, Ky.: Daniel Bradford, 1807.

Journal of the First Constitutional Convention of Kentucky, Held in Danville, Kentucky, April 2 to 19, 1792, Lexington, Ky.: State Bar Association, 1942.

The Kentucky Gazette. January 2, 1790, May 17, 1792, May 25, 1793, June 4, 1796, November 5, 1796, May 17, 1796, August 15, 1798, September 15, 1800, December 28, 1802, March 22, 1808.

Lane, Ben, Richmond, KY, personal collection—“A Few Facts and Events Surrounding the Town of Washington in 1786,” George H. S. King to the Rev. Melvin Lee Steadman, January 20, 1962, and Mrs. Stanley Reed to George H. S. King January 15, 1962, original in Va. State Archives, “Stations and Settlements and Preemptions in and Around Washington.”

“Surveyor’s Measurers,” TM, from Kentucky Historical Society vertical files.

Diane Perrine Coon

 

 

 

 

Abolitionists in Northern Kentucky

The following article was published in the Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky, 2009, University Press of Kentucky.

Abolitionists. The term abolitionists refers to those in the antebellum U.S. who wished to “abolish” slavery completely. In this way, abolitionists differed from other antislavery proponents such as “emancipationists,” who supported gradual emancipation of slaves with compensation to their owners, and colonizationists, who promoted sending freed slaves to Africa.

The religious base for early abolitionism came directly from Quakers such as Arnold Buffin, Elihu Embree, and Charles Osborne and was well established by 1830. The evangelical basis for national abolitionism began in 1833 with the founding of the American Antislavery Society by William Lloyd Garrison, Lewis and Arthur Tappan, and Thomas Weld among many others. Disagreements emerged among these abolitionists relating to the constitutional framework of the U.S. and how it pertained to slavery. Garrison and others argued that the U.S. Constitution favored slavery and must be overthrown through civil disobedience; James G. Birney and many others argued that political action by amending the U.S. Constitution would achieve the ends of eliminating slavery. Garrison was adamantly against political action believing it would diffuse the religious and moral foundation of the antislavery movement. The Liberty Party ran Birney as an antislavery candidate for president in 1840 and 1844 and Gerrit Smith in 1848, but by then the emerging Free Soil Party had absorbed most of the antislavery abolitionists. Those abolitionists favoring direct action against slavery encouraged boycotting southern goods and services, aiding runaway slaves through the Underground Railroad, and running antislavery candidates for state and national offices. The Tappan brothers were credited with much of the financing of the Underground Railroad and for helping to place its agents along the Ohio River. By the mid-1850s, the American Missionary Association had begun direct confrontation on the issue of slavery by placing colporteurs throughout the South, by bringing Bibles to slaves, and by distributing antislavery tract materials to slave owners and yeomen farmers.

Southern slaveholders retaliated against abolitionists by employing their political power in the U.S. Congress and by direct action to mount posses, pay for detectives, extend the patroller system, and increase the rewards for returning runaway slaves. Once the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act was passed, Ky. slave owners vigorously challenged Underground Railroad operators in federal courts, winning either large judgments or having large fines levied against these operators for the slave owner’s lost slave properties. In 1849, slaveholders in Ky. won a huge political battle, sending an overwhelming majority of delegates to the Kentucky Constitutional Convention and in the Ky. Legislature that rolled back whatever antislavery legislation and protection free blacks had achieved over the previous fifty years. The abolitionists in Ky. were defeated, demoralized, and in disarray. John G. Fee’s autobiography cites many cases where pro-slavery mobs targeted the remaining few white abolitionists in Ky. and drove many of them out of state.

To abolitionists in the North, by the 1850s moderate tactics had not worked; slave states had aggressively expanded slavery into Tex., Ark., Mo., and threatened to bring it to Kans. The 1854 Kansas-Nebraska Act repealed the Missouri Compromise of 1820, which had prohibited slavery north of longitude 36°30,’ thereby opening up all federal territories to the possibility of slavery. With the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act, abolitionists could no longer trust that the U.S. Congress would rectify the matter of slavery. Likewise, they lost hope in the U.S. Supreme Court which, in the 1857 Dred Scott decision (Scott v. Sandford), declared the Missouri Compromise invalid, made any Congressional attempts to prohibit slavery in the territories unconstitutional, and regarded slaves as property protected by the U.S. . Constitution. With seemingly no recourse left to legislative or judicial action, the war of words erupted into armed aggression. John Brown’s antislavery raids in Kans. and his attack on the federal arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Va. in October 1859, were the first large-scale overt abolitionist confrontations and helped to divide the nation’s opinion on slavery into opposing camps.

Passive support to aid runaway slaves now became active tactics, emboldening even more slaves to escape from the South. From 1836 to 1840, antislavery societies espousing political, economic, and direct action against the institution of slavery spread throughout Ohio and Ind. Slave losses from the river counties of Ky. and the state’s Bluegrass region mounted significantly during the late 1840s and 1850s. Each time a Ky. posse went into Mich., Ind., or Ohio to retrieve runaway slaves, angry abolitionists determined to wrest the evil from the nation met them. Furthermore, abolitionist “agitators” from these and other Northern states began reaching down into Ky. with greater frequency.

In his 2005 book, Bound for Canaan, Fergus Bordewich points to the 1852 death of Isaac Tatum Hooper in New York City, N.Y., as the end of the early period of the abolitionist movement, a period characterized as being one in which humble and religious friends of fugitives simply were aiding other human beings. In Northern Kentucky, one might mark the watershed of this change to 1847, when armed mobs rebuffed the slave catcher Francis Troutman and his Carroll Co., Ky. posse at Marshall, Mich.; or when the Reverend Benjamin Sebastian and George W. Brazier’s posse from Boone Co., Ky., was confronted at Cass Co., Mich., and summarily dispatched from the state. Further marking these changes were the dramatic incursions of Elijah Anderson and John Fairfield in Ky. into Boone Co. taking dozens of slaves out of this county.

Northern abolitionists who used aggressive strategies sometimes used military terms and tactics. They also sent spies and colporteurs into the South deliberately to confront slaveholders and they routinely accosted any “southern kidnappers” coming into northern antislavery states to capture runaway slaves. The new contemporary popular faces of the abolitionist movement included the talented black orator Frederick Douglass and the soon notorious John Brown.

The continuous uproar from antagonistic abolitionist tactics was not received well in Ky. Conservative antislavery leaders and even Cassius Clay disavowed both this period’s abolitionist leaders and their tactics. The few abolitionists remaining in Ky. were easily targeted for reprisal. John G. Fee and his tiny coterie living in Madison, Lewis, and Bracken counties during the 1850s were particularly vulnerable, because they acted openly and confronted deeply-held local prejudices. Even across the Ohio River in Ripley, Ohio, a number of leading citizens were opposed to the overt abolitionist actives of such locals as Rev. John Rankin and John Parker.

According to an overwhelming majority of Ky.’s citizens, the despised abolitionists were agitators from the North, people who interfered with Ky.’s states rights, who enticed and stole slaves from decent, law abiding citizens, and who broke national, state, and local laws. According to most newspapers in Ky., it was these abolitionists who confronted Ky. posses lawfully trying to retrieve “lost slave property” in Ind., Mich., and Ohio. It was also these zealot abolitionists who persisted in destroying the national unity of the Methodist Episcopal and the Presbyterian denominations by their activities. Moreover, it was these radical abolitionists who forced President Abraham Lincoln (1861–1865) to issue the Emancipation Proclamation in January 1863 and to accept Negro troops to fight for the Union. Kentuckians may not have been united on many issues during these difficult times, but they were, generally speaking, united in their abhorrence for the white abolitionists.

Ky.’s abolitionists who were white were easy to spot and few in numbers. On the other hand, Ky.’s abolitionists who were black were numerous and concentrated into the state’s large urban areas–Louisville, Lexington, Frankfort, Northern Kentucky, and across the river in Cincinnati, Ohio. They were also congregated in small separate rural slave churches and were spread out geographically as individuals still in bondage across the hundreds of plantations in the north central and Bluegrass regions of Ky. Although black preachers were suspected of abolitionist leanings, and isolated free blacks certainly were among the first to be accused of aiding fugitive slaves, few slave owners actually thought their own slaves might be abolitionists who were providing direct help to runaway slaves.

As their slave losses mounted, slave owners in Ky. took action against the abolitionists in their midst and also crossed the Ohio River. Bounties were set for people like John Carr, John Fairfield, the Reverend Charles Ide, and other white abolitionists active in the Underground Railroad.

Author Ann Hagedorn tells of several attacks on abolitionists in Brown Co., Ohio, led by Mason Co., Ky., slave owner Col. Edward Towers. In late fall 1844, his posse inflicted more than one hundred lashes of the whip on Harbor Hurley, a longtime free black at Sardinia, Ohio, attacked and killed Robert Miller, lynched a runaway slave, attacked Absalom King and several who were helping to defend him, and burned Miller and King’s homes. The Georgetown, Ohio, sheriff appeared unable to stop the marauding Kentuckians.

The most celebrated attacks by Ky. slave owners were associated with a secretive organization of slave owners established in Covington, Ky., in 1846, modeled after the Western Horsemen’s Association set up in the western U.S. to deal with horse thieves. A spy calling himself Carpenter was hired and sent to Mich. to find runaway slaves from Northern Kentucky. This spy came back with detailed reports that supplied names, places where slaves were hiding, and the names of plantations where they had been enslaved. Based on this information, in December 1846 young Lexington attorney Francis Townsend along with David Giltner, the son of a central Ky. slave holding family, William Franklin Ford, James S. Lee, and several other Kentuckians traveled to Marshall, Mich., to recapture the Adam Crosswhite family, slave runaways from the Giltner Plantation. The invaders from Ky., however, were turned away by an armed mob, arrested, and subsequently fined for having disturbed the peace.

George W. Brazier, a slave jobber, and Benjamin Stevens from Boone Co. in Ky. mounted a posse to recapture as many as fifty runaway slaves identified by a spy known as Carpenter who was sent to Cass Co., Mich. This posse too was met by armed men, arrested, fined and escorted out of the state.

Cassius M. Clay was a dramatic and significant figure in Ky.’s antislavery movement, not only for editing The Lexington True American, but also for his public speeches and frequent bouts with pro-slavery advocates in Ky. Although Clay was feted and applauded as an antislavery Southerner at Abolitionist Society meetings in New York City, he clearly favored gradual emancipation with monetary recompense to slave owners. Of all the colorful episodes in Clay’s experiences, none was more lasting than the 600 acres of land he assigned in Madison Co., Ky., to John G. Fee to start the northern emigrant community of Berea. This community, along with Camp Nelson in Jessamine Co., became the nexus for true abolitionist sentiment and actions in Ky.

Clay and Fee could not remain united in their thinking for long; Fee was disappointed by Clay’s political expediency, and Clay felt that Fee’s radicalism mixing feminism and anti-caste sentiments with antislavery beliefs actually damaged the antislavery case in Ky. The break between the two Ky.-born abolitionists was public and painful. Fee believed that Clay’s denunciation of him led directly to harassment and mob actions to evict the abolitionists from Madison Co. in 1859, however, it is more likely that Berea College with its Oberlin, Ohio, trained teachers as northern abolitionists, and because white and black men and women were being educated together at the college, was enough to create a pro-slavery furor in Berea, with or without Cassius M. Clay’s approval or disapproval. After all, Fee’s closest associates in Bracken and Lewis counties in Ky. were driven out by pro-slavery mobs about the same time, and Clay had nothing to do with those cases. Simultaneously, abolitionist societies, such as the American Missionary Association and particularly the Western Freedmen’s Aid Commission at Cincinnati, continued to provide immediate supplies and relief materials to former slaves. Additionally, clothing, building materials, and even garden tools and seeds were being sent to assist free blacks who had remained in the South.

Also active in these sorts of activities were sectarian agencies such as the Baptist Home Missionary Society, the Episcopal Missionary Society, and the Methodist Home Missionary Society. In July 1864, a convention at Indianapolis, Ind., cited the following agencies as cooperating to provide direct aid to freedmen–the Cleveland (Ohio) Freedmen’s Aid Commission, the Contraband Relief Commission at Cincinnati, the Friends’ Aid Committee of Richmond, Ind., the Indiana Freemen’s Aid Commission at Indianapolis, the North-Western Freedmen’s Aid Commission at Chicago, Ill., the Western Freedmen’s Aid Commission at Cincinnati, and the Western Sanitary Commission at St. Louis, Mo. Even following the Civil War, efforts were made to improve the lot of blacks remaining in the South as many of the Freedmen’s Bureau Schools became completely dependent on teachers recruited and paid by abolitionist groups, such as these.

 

 

Black Abolitionists of Northern Kentucky Active on the Ohio River

Place Name Date(s) Activities
Madison Elijah Anderson 1838–46 Conductor, Organizer (200 aided)
Lawrenceburg Elijah Anderson 1846–56 Conductor, Organizer (800 aided)
Madison George De Baptiste 1838–1845 Conductor, Organizer (180 aided)
Madison John Carter 1838–1860 Organizer, Conductor, and Recruiter
Madison Griffin Booth, George Evans, and John Lott 1830–1846 Conductors, safe houses
Milton, Ky. Peter Scott 1840–1850 Local agent, Organizer
Eagle Hollow, Ind. Reverend Chapman Harris 1845–1860 Conductor, Manager River Crossings
Hunters Bottom, Ky. Richard Daly 1845–1856 River Crossing to Eagle Hollow
  1. Hanover, Ind.
John R. Forcen,Simon Gray, and

Mason Thompson

1840–1860 Conductors
Coopers Bottom, Ky. Freeman Anderson 1850s Slave in place, river crossings to S. Hanover
Carrollton, Ky. Wheeling Gaunt and Samuel Lightfoot 1840s, 1850s Safe houses
Warsaw, Ky. John Brookngs and Lewis Hamilton, 1838–1861 Gallatin Co. grand jury
Rising Sun, Ind. Rabbit Hash, Ky. Samuel Barkshire, Joseph Edington, and William Thompson 1840–1850s Safe houses, Thompson a conductor from Clarksburg Ind.
Covington, Ky. John R. Bradley 1830–1860 Lane Seminary debates
Cincinnati, Ohio John Malvin 1830s Aided Susan Hall and 8 children
Cincinnati ,Ohio Henry Boyd 1820–1860 Safe House and organizer
Cincinnati, Ohio Framces Scroggins, Williams Watson, and John Woodson 1830–1840s Safe House and conductor
Cincinnati, Ohio John Mercer Langston and Major James Wilkerson 1830s-1840s Organizer, defender against mobs
Cincinnati, Ohio Rev. Allen E. Graham 1840s Union Baptist Church, Cincinnati, Ohio, columnist for the Palladium of Liberty
Cincinnati, Ohio Joseph Carter Corbin 1850–1860s Editor, The Colored Citizen, Cincinnati; graduate Ohio University, later president University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
Felicity, Ohio Will Sleet 1840–1850s Leader of Free Black community aiding fugitive slaves
Red Oak, Ohio Harbor Hurley and George Williams 1844      1856 100 lashes given by Mason Co., Ky., posse in Ind. unprovoked; Williams jailed in Ky. penitentiary and died, forced confession
Ripley, Ohio Aunt Polly Jackson, Rhoda Jones, Uncle Billy Marshall, and John P. Parker 1840–1850s Maysville, Ky., Crossings to Ripley, Ohio
Bracken Co., Ky. Arnold Gragston and Julett Miles 1850s Conductor, Crossing to Ripley, Ohio; Julett a woman jailed at Frankfort, Ky., for trying to get her children to freedom visited by Fee.

 

White Abolitionists of Northern Kentucky Active along the Ohio River

Place Name Date(s) Activities
Eagle Hollow Charles Almond, John Carr, John and Samuel Ledgerwood, Charlie Lutz, Jared Ryker, John Taylor, and William Woolen 1839–1861 Organizer, conductor, safe houses
Carroll, Trimble, Gallatin, and Franklin William Phelps and George Whitehead American Antislavery Society agents from Wheeling, W.Va.
Carrollton, Ky. Alex Fuller and the William Lee family 1850s Organizer, conductor
Lamb, Ind. George C. Ash, Captain Hildreth, William and John Shaw, and Thomas Wright 1840s-1861 Ferrymen, safe houses
Vevay, Ind. Rev. James Duncan and Stephen Stevens 1824–1830 Founders of the Liberty Party in Ind.
Vevay Ind. Stephen Girard and John and Stephen H. Pavy 1830–1861 Organizer, safe house, conductors
Warsaw,  Sugar Creek ,Ky.,and Patriot, Ind. Alex and Duncan Fuller and Daniel and Johnathan Howe 1840s, 1850s River crossings and safe houses
Florence and Quercus Grove Indiana Rev. Alexander Sebastian 1840s-1861 River crossings and safe houses, antislavery churches
Switzerland and Dearborn counties Ind. Rev. Charles Ide and Orthaniel H. Reed 1840s Organizer, bounty set for his capture by slave owners
Aurora, Ind. Daniel Bartholomew, Dr. Myron Harding, John Hope, John Milburn, the Harding, Shockley, and Shattuck families, and William Wymandon 1835–1861 Station Master at Aurora, Ind., managed three major routes, safe houses
Manchester, Ind. John Angevin, John and Ralph Collier, Joseph Hall, Thomas and John Hansell, and Seth Platt 1835–1861 Safe houses, conductors
Guilford and Lawrenceburg, Ind. Henry Beecher, Rev. John Clarke, Martin C. Ewbank, Benjamin Metcalf, and Thomas Smith 1835–1850 Organizer, co-founder of Indiana Antislavery Society, safe houses, members of Dearborn Co. Antislavery Society
Covington, Ky. Thomas Carneal and Rev. Joseph Cabell Harrison 1850s Political activist, safe house
Newport, Ky. William Shreve Bailey 1839–1850s Newspaper editor
Cincinnati, Ohio Harriet Beecher, Salmon P. Chase, Levi and Catherine Coffin, Mark Campbell McMaken, Calvin Stowe, Zebulon Strong,, Theodore Weld, Samuel and Sally Wilson 1830–1850 Student, Author, Teacher, Activists, safe house, Free Store, political leader, railroad guide
Cincinnati, Ohio James G. Birney and Cassius M. Clay 1840s-1850s Newspaper editors
Cincinnati, Ohio John G. Fee, William Hamilton, Thomas Metcalfe, and the Ky. delegates April 1854 Antislavery convention focused on repeal of 1850 Fugitive Slave Act and repudiation of Kansas-Nebraska bill, Hamilton editor of the Patriot, Metcalfe former governor
Cincinnati, Ohio Rev. D. H. Allen, Rev. C. B. Boynton, Levi Coffin, Edward Harwood, Rev. C. Kingsley, J. F. Larkin, James B. Luplton, Rev. G. M. Maxwell, William P. Nixon, Rev. Adam Poe, Rev. R. H. Pollock, Richard B. Pullan, M. Sawyer, Hon. Bellamy Storer, Rev. H. M. Storrs, Dr. J. Taft, Rev. M. L. P. Thompson, Rev. John M. Walden, and Dr. J. P. Walker 1850–1860s Western Freedmen’s Aid Commission, relief materials—clothing, supplies, tools, school supplies, and teachers, industrial arts schools,
Pendleton Co., Ky. to Clermont Co., Ohio Rev. Silas Chase, Andrew Coombs, Arthur Fee, Oliver P. S. Fee, Robert Fee, Thomas Fee, Nelson Gibson, Dr. Mathew Givson, Joseph Parrish, and Andrew Powell 1840–1850s Felicity, Ohio, station master and conductors; Moscow, Ohio, safe houses and conductors
Bracken Co., Ky. James B. Cripps 1850s Delegate to Free Democratic convention in Pittsburgh, Pa., arrested for aiding fugitive slave falsely
Bracken Co., Covington, Mason Co., and Madison Co., Ky. John G. Fee, Mr. Fields, John D. Gregg and John Humlong at Bracken Co., Ky., Vincent Hamilton (John G. Fee’s father-in- law), Mr. Marsh in Madison and Garrard Co., Ky., Ham Rawlings, William Stapp, James Waters, and W. B. Wright 1840–1860 Organizer, antislavery churches and antislavery societies, major Ky. abolitionist and activist
Germantown, Ky.
  1. M. Mallett
1850s Teacher at school at Bethesda, Ky., driven out by pro-slavery forces
Augusta, Ky. Arthur Thome 1840–1850s Organizer, safe house
Sardinia, Ohio John B. Mahan 1840s Tricked by William Greathouse, tried in Ky. in Mason Co., jailed in Washington, Ky., organizer for Liberty Party and Philanthropist subscriptions, died of tuberculosis contracted in jail
Maysville, Ky.—Ripley Ohio Dr. Alfred Beasley, Dr. Alexander Campbell, Thomas Collins, Rev. James Gilliland, Archibald Leggett, Thomas McCaque, Dr. G. Norton, and Rev. John Rankin 1840s-1861 Organizer, safe houses, conductors, physicians
Washington, Ky. James A. Paxton 1830–1861 Safe house
Lewis Co., Ky. James S. Davis 1850s Cabin Creek, Ky., antislavery church.

 

Abolitionists from Other Regions and States

Active in Northern Kentucky

Place Name Date(s) Activities
Mason Co. Rev. Calvin Fairbanks and Delia Webster 1844 Escape of Lewis Hayden from Lexington, Ky; from Oberlin, Ohio, and Vt.
Boone Co., and other parts of Northern Kentucky John Fairfield Late 1840s Brought 28 out at one time, dare-devil exploits; from Va. and Mich.
Bracken Co. Edward James “Patrick” Doyle 1848 Aborted escape of 40 to 75 runaway slaves from Lexington, Ky., area; from Ireland, Bardstown and Danville, Ky.
Boone Co. Laura S. Haviland 1850s Disguised as free person of color, went into Boone Co., Ky., to get word to John White’s wife, from Adrian, Mich.
Trimble, Carroll, Gallatin, and Franklin counties William Phelps and George Whitefield 1840s Agents of American Antislavery Society, organizers establishing routes and safe houses, from Wheeling W.Va.
Bracken Co. Rev. Daniel Worth June 1853 Wesleyan minister from Ohio, active in AMA; joined John G. Fee in preaching in Bracken Co., Ky.
Lewis and Bracken Co. Rev. Edward Matthews 1850s Antislavery preacher from the Free Mission Baptists, preached with John G. Fee several times
Madison Co. Wiley Fisk 1850s Controversial preacher with AMA
Rockcastle Co.
  1. G. W. Parker
1853 Colporteur from AMA arrested falsely—charged with aiding fugitive slaves—to break up a protracted meeting of John G. Fee
Northern Kentucky William Haines and James West 1850s Colporteurs from AMA distributed antislavery literature and Bibles to slaves
Berea, Camp Nelson, Pulaski, Jackson, and Garrard counties John Burnham, George Candee, Dr. Chase of N.H., John G. Hanson, Roger Jones, Bros. Myers, Thomas E. Renfro, Bro. Richardson, John A. R. Rogers, Miss Tucker, and Otis B. Waters  1850–1860s Close allies, teachers, and companions of John G. Fee
Ohio River Valley Arnold Buffin andRev. Lewis Hicklin 1840 Buffin, president of American Antislavery Society and a Quaker, Hicklin a Methodist Protestant preacher and brother of Thomas Hicklin, a major Underground Railroad activist in Ind., both men associated with early organization of the routes from the Ohio River north to Levi Coffin and other Wayne Co., Ind., safe houses
Cabin Creek, Lewis Co. Francis Hawley 1852–1853 Antislavery Baptist minister came from Syracuse, N.Y., came to baptize John G. Fee and his wife in Cabin Creek, Ky. .

 

Bordewich, Fergus M. Bound for Canaan. New York: Amistad, 2005.

 

Coon, Diane Perrine. “Early African American Congregations of North Central Kentucky,” Afro-American Journal of History and Genealogy, Spring, 2005.

_________________ “Southeastern Indiana’s Underground Railroad Routes and Operations,” U.S. Park Service and Indiana DNR, 1999.

Drummond, Dwight Lowell. Antislavery: The Crusade for Freedom in America. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1961.

Fee, John G. Autobiography of John G. Fee. Chicago: National Christian Association, 1891.

 

Griffler, Keith P. Front Line of Freedom, African Americans and the Forging of the Underground Railroad in the Ohio Valley. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2004.

Hagedorn, Ann. Beyond the River. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2002.

Harrison, Lowell H. The Antislavery Movement in Kentucky. Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky, 1978.

Howard, Victor B. The Evangelical War against Slavery and Caste, the Life and Times of John G. Fee. Selinsgrove, Penn.: Susquehanna University Press, 1996.

Hudson, J. Blaine. Fugitive Slaves and the Underground Railroad in the Kentucky Borderland, Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Company, 2002.

Kentucky Educational Television, Underground Railroad Educational Resources. “Westward Expansion and the Development of Abolitionist Thought,” available at www.wcvn.org, accessed on September 19, 2006.

LaRoche, Cheryl Jenifer. “On the Edge of Freedom: Free Black Communities, Archaeology, and the Underground Railroad,” Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 2006.

Martin, Asa Earl. “Pioneer Antislavery Press,” Mississippi Valley Historical Review, 2 (March 1916): 510–528.

Rabb, Kate Milner, ed. A Tour Through Indiana in 1840, The Diary of John Parsons of Petersburg, Virginia. New York: Robert M. McBride & Company, 1920.

Ripley, C. Peter, ed. The Black Abolitionist Papers, III, IV and V. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1991.

Tallant, Harold D. Evil Necessity, Slavery and Political Culture in Antebellum Kentucky. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2003.

Turner, Wallace B. “Abolitionism in Kentucky,” RKHS, 69 (October 1971): 319–338.

 

Diane Perrine Coon

 

 

 

Anti-Slavery in Northern Kentucky

The following article was published as part of the Northern Kentucky Encyclopedia, 2009, University Press of Kentucky.

 

Antislavery. Antislavery movements in Ky. have been characterized by historians of slavery as Caucasian experiences, each new intellectual concept capturing attention, galvanizing sporadic actions, and then running out of steam. Biographies of Henry Clay, Cassius Marcellus Clay, John G. Fee, Robert J. and William Breckinridge, and even John Speed, champion the antislavery credentials of each of these prominent Kentuckians. Yet in spite of nearly continuous antislavery activity from 1830 to 1860 by some of Ky.’s leading social and political figures, slavery as an institution was stronger and more widely fixed in the state in 1860 than it was in 1830.

Several recent histories recall free people of color who provided aid to fugitive slaves, including Elijah Anderson, John P. Parker, George De Baptiste, Sheldon Morris and Washington Spradling. There are even a few slaves living in Ky. who have been identified as aiding other slaves during escapes–Arnold Gragston in Bracken Co., Richard Daly at Hunters Bottom, Uncle Simon and Ben Swain at Henderson, and Uncle Elias at Cattletsburg.

The only continuous antislavery activities from 1780 to 1860 in Ky. involved free people of color and slaves themselves. The black antislavery position required direct action–to purchase their freedom, escape to freedom, aid others escape to freedom, and to resist slavery in place. These actions alone did not overturn the institution of slavery, but they gave hundreds of slaves a free life and helped to injure slave owners economically. Neither the white antislavery pamphlets and conventions nor the pinpricks of black activism, however, were successful in removing slavery from Ky’s. soil. That required a bloody Civil War, the defeat of the Confederacy, and passage of the Thirteenth amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

When the Reverend David Rice stormed out of the 1792 State Constitutional Convention at Danville, Ky., the first antislavery movement in ky. involving whites had already reached its political zenith. Rice was among the early white Presbyterian, Baptist, and Methodist preachers and elders attempting to keep a perpetual slavery system out of Ky. For the early settlement in Ky., there were two models, that of the Northwest Territory just to its north across the Ohio River that was established free of slavery in 1786, and the Va. model that institutionalized slavery for people of African descent.

Passage of Article IX in the 1792 Ky. Constitution, over the objections of sixteen white preachers and lay leaders, permitted slave owners to bring their slaves into Ky. and gave local jurisdictions authority to regulate slavery. Rev. John Rankin’s short Memoir of Samuel Donnell shows some of the efforts to defeat Article IX’s passage in the activities, during the 1790s, of leaders of the Concord Presbyterian Church, located in Bourbon (later Harrison) Co

During the first three decades of the nineteenth century, the Va. planter system that had been brought to Ky. by the children of the Va. gentry solidified through landholdings and political power. And the number of slaves imported into Ky. rose from 40,843 in 1800 to 126,742 in 1820. In those twenty years, the slave system won out in the Commonwealth of Ky. through overt political power of the landed gentry and failure of the yeomen farmers to perceive that slavery was detrimental to their own welfare. The state’s planter class took control as magistrates, as judges, as elected legislators, senators, and governors, and large sections of middle Ky. became Whig in its political leanings, Henry Clay territory. Most significantly, property rights, i.e. land and slaves, became defined like a religious dogma standing above justice, mercy, and equality under God.

Yet in those same twenty years, the Second Great Awakening in religion sent evangelistic tremors through and around mainstream Protestant denominations in Ky. Religiosity spread chiefly through the yeoman classes into Ky. It originated with the Separate and Freewill Baptists denominations that sprang from George Whitfield and Stubal Stearns, with the Pentecostal experience of Presbyterians, Methodists, and Reformed Baptists at Cane Run in Ky. in 1801 and subsequent tent revivals, and from the peeling away from Presbyterians by Associate Reformed, Cumberland and Rankinites, from Methodists by Methodist Protestants, and later the Wesleyans. And in all this turmoil, many Kentuckians found slavery incompatible with their new heightened sense of divine purpose, deciding that slavery was evil and was bringing harm to the new nation. The contemporary question, therefore, was what to do about the problem?

Between 1800 and 1827, a number of second generation Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, and Reformed preachers advocated moral persuasion to convince slaveholders to free their slaves in their wills and leave sufficient land or financial resources so the slaves could make a living in Ky. or go to the North. A few of these ministers advocated educating slaves for future freedom, baptizing slaves, and identifying trustworthy slaves that could act as elders and deacons for separate black congregations.

For the Baptists, between 1803 and 1806, the issue came to a head at Mt. Sterling, Ky., in the person of David Barrow, a minister in the Separate Baptist tradition who served the Mt. Sterling, Goshen, and Lulbegrud churches. Through political pressure from the Regular Baptists of the Elkhorn Baptist Association and their fledgling Bracken Baptist Association, David Barrow was expelled from the North District Baptist Association in 1806 for advocating the gradual emancipation of slaves and eventual abolition of slavery itself.

Barrow not only preached continuously against slavery, but he published British Baptist Thomas Clarkson’s Essay on Slavery and Commerce of the Human Species, a 1785 treatise that greatly influenced U.S. abolitionists. Barrow himself wrote Involuntary, Unmerited, Perpetual, Absolute, Hereditary Slavery Examined on the Principles of Nature, Reason, Justice, Policy and Scripture that was printed in 1808 by John Bradford at Lexington, Ky. That same year, Barrow joined Carter Tarrant and founded the Baptized Licking-Locust Association, Friends of Humanity, also known as the Emancipation Baptists. The Baptized Licking-Locust Association, Friends of Humanity, included the Licking Locust, Gilgal, and Bracken Baptist churches from the Bracken Baptist Association, and Lawrence Creek Baptist Church from Mason Co.

Because of religious convictions, some slave owners in Ky. would decide to manumit their slaves. However, because in Ky. the average number of slaves held were generally not large these separate individual actions by white slaveholders did not significantly reduce the numbers of slaves held statewide. In the entire period from 1799 to 1868 in Bracken Co. in Northern Kentucky, for example, slaveholders filed only 156 emancipation records in the courthouse, 14 of them in 1834–1836 by Arthur Thome of Augusta. In Owen Co. in 1847, Susan Herndon Rogers freed ten slaves, the Locust family, and gave them 403 acres known as Free Station, or Mountain Island. Her brother James Herndon executed a bond in 1853 for $21,000 in order to have his twenty-two slaves manumitted. The Vinegar, Smith and Carroll families divided 125 acres at Mountain Island (Theodore Vinegar). By 1827, the Emancipation movement in Ky. that had been spurred on by the Great Awakening ran out of steam as the movement’s leaders died or moved away, the impact of moral persuasion proved anemic.

It was Kentuckian Henry Clay, long an advocate of gradual emancipation, who in 1817 stimulated the founding of the national American Colonization Society, an idea originally floated in 1800 by Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe. It was not until 1823, that the first of the local colonization societies were created in Ky. Even though there were few free people of color in Ky. in those early years, white slaveholders continuously tried to get them to leave the state, fearing these freedmen would inspire blacks in bondage in Ky. to seek freedom. Colonization was fundamentally an answer to the reality that if slavery were ended, the South would have hundreds of thousands of freed slaves, a nightmare scenario to whites who dominated and controlled the slave system. Colonization as an antislavery concept built on the underlying racism and fear by the white power structure.

Many historians described the reaction of slaveholders to Nat Turner Rebellion in Va. in 1831 as a near hysteria that swept through the entire South producing far more stringent controls on slaves and heightening fears that free blacks might become agitators. In step with these times, contemporary newspapers in Ky., including ones in Northern Kentucky, regularly published sensationalized accounts of all slave revolts in the U.S. and in the Carribbean.

Colonization, then, had more to do with white fear of freed blacks, than it did with ending slavery. Through Clay’s legislative skills and support from many of the Southern delegations, the federal government was persuaded to purchase land in Africa. Ky.’s Colonization leaders—Henry Clay, Robert J. Breckinridge, William L. Breckinridge, John C. Underwood, some Old School Presbyterian congregations, and some Methodist Episcopal Church’s congregations—embraced the colonization concepts, because it would rid Ky. of the perceived twin evils, perpetual slavery and the fact that the nation had 250,000 freed blacks. By sending all blacks back to Africa, Ky. and the nation would thus be able to eliminate its race problem. Moreover, by supporting gradual emancipation, Ky. slaveholders would continue to benefit from their slaves economically until properly compensated for their “loss of property.” The only problem with the often-debated scenarios of the colonization movement was that the free people of color living in Ky. did not want to go to Africa. In the thirty years of activity, Ky. sent only 658 freed blacks to Africa, and some of them returned. Maysville had an active colonization society which, in May 1827, met at the Presbyterian Meeting House and elected the following officers:, Adam Beatty, John Chambers, Rev. John T. Edgar, William Huston Jr., Andrew M. January and as Managers: Johnston Armstrong, Lewis Collins, Peter Grant, James Morris, Captain Thomas Nicholson, Isaac Outten, Major Valentine Peers, James M. Runyon, Francis Taylor, and Rev. Walter Warder.

Many, if not most, of the early antislavery people left Ky. as soon as the land title offices opened in Ind. and Ill. They found themselves neighbors to fiercely antislavery farmers from Me., N.H., Vt., and upstate N.Y., and among these antislavery peoples in Ind. and Ill. early runaway slaves found people willing to give them food, rough shelter, and direction where another safe place might be found. By mid-1824, several friendly communities aiding runaway slaves dotted the shoreline across from Ky. on the north side of the Ohio River–Vevay and Pleasant Township in Switzerland Co., Ind.; the Free Will Baptists, Methodist Protestants, and Universalists of Aurora and Dearborn Co., Ind.; and the Seceder and Associate Reformed Presbyterians of South Hanover and Carmel and Rykers Ridge outside Madison, Ind. In Ohio, major assisting communities for runaway slaves were forming in Clermont and Brown counties.

As people migrated from N.C. and eastern Tenn. into and through Ky., information about the Quaker and Separate Baptist- inspired manumission societies filtered into the Commonwealth of Ky. A total of eighty-nine manumission societies had been established before 1830 along the Va. and Carolina tidewater cities and in Tenn. There were fifty manumission societies in N.C., and twenty-five societies, totaling 1,000 members, were formed in eastern Tenn., particularly in the area around Jonesboro. Quaker abolitionists transported hundreds of former slaves, purchased intact by family or manumitted by slave owners under the proviso that these freedmen would be taken out of the South. Soon free black agricultural communities emerged all along the southern regions of Ohio, Ind. and Ill. Each of these communities became a haven for runaway slaves.

Runaways found shelter among Ky.’s Free Blacks that had been brought, sent or who migrated naturally into the Northwest Territory. In 1821, E.S. Abdy, a British scholar, found runaway slaves hiding among formerly enslaved Kentuckians at Graysville, near Hanover, Ind. These transplanted Kentuckians, black and white, often guided by evangelistic religious denominations, were natural adherents of antislavery societies of the late 1830s, were often activists in the emerging Underground Railroad, and were promoters of antislavery political parties.

In the river counties north of the Ohio River, Universalists and Free Will Baptists, Seceder and Associate Reformed Presbyterians—all denominations that promoted true equality and slavery as the root of evil in the American political system—had only a modest influence as religious denominations on both sides of the Ohio River, but they clearly had a major impact on those individuals choosing to aid fugitive slaves.

Prior to 1838, when local and statewide antislavery societies were formed in Ind. and Ohio, aid to fugitive slaves was handled informally by small cells of antislavery black and white families that had relatives or trusted friends further north. Even with regular meetings and attempts to create secure routes to handle increasing numbers of runaway slaves, the so-called Underground Railroad was never very organized and continued to rely on experienced free black conductors such as Elijah Anderson and John P. Parker to bring large numbers of runaway slaves out of Ky. to freedom.

Cheryl LaRoche’s recent work comparing and contrasting free black agricultural communities in southern Ill., Ind., and Ohio concluded that harboring and aiding runaway slaves was a natural activity, an extension of their own experiences as former slaves and now freedmen. She also points out the significance of Bishop William Paul Quinn’s evangelism on behalf of the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME), the founding of aggressive antislavery churches, and Prince Hall Masonic orders as being significant components in establishing successful Underground Railroad routes. On Ky. soil, the AME congregations–Quinn Chapel in Louisville, St. James in Lexington, St. John in Frankfort, Bethel at Shelbyville, Ky., and Mill Creek in Cincinnati, Ohio–were all associated with black abolitionist and Underground Railroad activities.

Alarmed by the large free black community at Cincinnati and the economic loss of slaves along the Ohio River, Northern Kentucky newspapers provided a steady drumbeat over the 1840s and 1850s portraying abolitionists and free people of color with extreme pro-slavery prejudice. The 1829 and 1841 race riots at Cincinnati were portrayed as proof that blacks could not make good citizens while ignoring that Ky. invaders and white troublemakers had brought about this violence, even to the point of employing cannons in use against the black community of Cincinnati. The 1831 Lane Seminary debates in Cincinnati by Theodore Weld, James Bradley, and others were not covered as being challenges to slavery as an institution but rather as examples of unruly and disruptive elements among the seminary’s students. To Ky. newspapers, the 1836 mob violence against James Birney’s antislavery newspaper press in Cincinnati was not an infringement of U.S. Constitutional rights, but rather showed that even in Ohio, the vast majority of citizens objected to formation of the Philanthopist, an avowed antislavery newspaper. Underground Railroad agents, John G. Fee’s congregations in Ky. in Bracken, Madison and Lewis counties, Berea College in Ky., the Liberty Party, and the Indiana and Ohio Antislavery Societies all, in turn, were portrayed by these newspapers as irresponsible agitation by outsiders interfering in Ky.’s affairs. Were the newspapers representing prevailing sentiment among Ky.’s citizens or goading latent prejudices into action? The arguments cut both ways among recent historians.

In the debates leading up to the 1849 Ky. Constitutional Convention, 475 supporters of constitutional emancipation met in 1848 at Maysville in Mason Co. However, the antislavery resolution they drafted at this meeting was in reality a principal plank of the colonizationists–a plan for gradual emancipation and immediate colonization rather than the outright repeal the early Emancipationists desired.

During the 1850s, abolitionists in Ind. and Ohio, concluded it was time to press hard for an end to slavery in the U.S. The “Slave Power” of southern states had broken the Missouri Compromise and was in the process of extending slavery beyond the Mississippi River; no southern state seemed likely to abandon institutional slavery on its own. a point driven home further when the institution of slavery was reaffirmed by Ky.’s new State Constitution in 1850.

Immediatists in Ind. and Ohio split, however, on the means. Boycotting southern products, actively supporting the Underground Railroad, political action through the Liberty and Free Soil Parties, and creating communities sympathetic to northern views on slavery—such as John G. Fee had done at Berea, Ky.–in the midst of southerners were some of the concepts followed. On the national level, Abolitionist William Garrison disapproved of any action other than moral persuasion. John G. Fee’s Berea plan was attractive to the Garrisonites. However, many northern abolitionists believed that only through political action would slavery ever be overturned. James G. Birney turned from gradualism to outright abolition in what he advocated as a leader of the Liberty Party. Salmon P. Chase of Ohio and many of the Ind. leaders pushed the Free Soil Party’s agenda to prevent further encroachment of slavery in the western territories. Infuriated by passage of the 1850 Fugitive Slave Act, these abolitionists helped to influence the nomination of Abraham Lincoln for U.S. President by the new Republican Party in 1860.

Direct political action to overturn slavery took many forms. Levi Coffin championed a boycott system by northerners and antislavery people refusing to buy Southern products made from slave labor. His store in Cincinnati sold goods made by free labor, and eliminated cotton products among many others agricultural products tied to the economy of the South. The American Missionary Society tried to distribute thousands of Bibles and antislavery tracts through the South through colporteurs, religious men, and women who traveled with suitcases and satchels full of what pro-slavery forces in the South termed “incendiary literature.” John G. Fee was very much associated with colporteurs in Central Kentucky.

Eli Thayer and John C. Underwood are credited with pushing the American Missionary Society’s activity beyond colporteurs to promote and finance the concept of “northern emigrant communities.” This direct action placed Northern abolitionist Christians living in the middle South and in the disputed western territories to model wage egalitarian societies so slaveowners could be shown how freedmen might act if they were educated and treated as citizens. The emigrant community established Kansas in the 1850s, so much associated with John Brown and the Missouri raids, was the first attempt to test these ideas. The emigrant community established at Ceredo, W.Va., near Ashland, Ky., was a far more successful venture focusing on mining and milling as a profit center. But in Ky., the most famous and controvesial of these abolitionist efforts was the failed community John G. Fee tried to establish in 1859 at Berea that also included a co-educational, integrated college. Located in Berea on lands granted by Cassius M. Clay, both the planned abolitionist colony and the college were immediately targeted by pro-slavery forces angered by John Brown’s October 1859 violent raid on Harpers Ferry, Va., and Fee and his colleagues were forced to flee across the Ohio River.

Typical of the reaction in Ky. to the expulsion of Fee and his associates was a resolution on January 21, 1860, at a meeting at Orangeburg in Mason Co., declaring: “No Abolitionist has the right to establish himself in the slaveholding community and disseminate opinions and principles destructive of the tranquility and safety.” Northerners, therefore, should look to their own salvation and leave Kentuckians alone.

Antebellum newspapers in Northern Kentucky aligned with either the Whig or the Democratic parties and treated news about runaway slaves, slave uprisings and Underground Railroad activities as crime stories. They also reported legislative acts of U.S. Congress concerning slavery, foreign news about the African slave trade, and announced local meetings of abolition, pro-slavery or colonization society meetings. In the 1840s and 1850s, Democratic newspapers took a decidedly anti-black position, running alarmist news stories about the Patrick Doyle slave revolt, Margaret Garner’s trial in Cincinnati for murdering her child , the Henderson slave revolt, runaway slave recaptures, and wherever possible, examples of escaped slaves who returned to their masters voluntarily. The villains in these articles were always Northern agitator abolitionists. Free blacks were characterized as buffoons, criminals, or puffed up by self-importance and by “trying to imitate their betters.”

In 1835, James Gillespie Birney, a slave owner who emancipated his slaves that year, and forty others founded the Ky. chapter of the American Antislavery Society and announced plans for a newspaper, the Philanthropist, to be printed at Danville, Ky., along with a postal campaign to send one million pieces of antislavery literature throughout the South. Danville literally ran James G. Birney and his antislavery publication out of town. Ironically, Birney’s father had supported Rev. David Rice, a Presbyterian minister, in attempting to keep slavery out of Ky. at the state’s 1792 constitutional convention.

Undaunted, Birney published the first issue of the Philanthropist on January 1, 1836, at New Richmond, Ohio, opposite Campbell Co., Ky., He subsequently moved the paper to Cincinnati where an angry mob destroyed the press on July 30, 1836. Birney continued publication of a paper with widespread support among antislavery people in the Northwest states. Editorially, the Philanthopist broke with William Lloyd Garrison’s emphasis on moral persuasion and actively encouraged political action. Birney founded the Liberty Party and ran for president in 1840 and again in 1844. Most of the leading antislavery people in the nation contributed articles to the Philanthropist.

Northern Kentucky made its own contribution to the establishment and printing of an antislavery newspaper through William Shreve Bailey’s The Newport News beginning in 1839 at Newport, Ky., in Campbell Co. Editorially, Bailey was a one-man show, championing the economic interests of working class people and claiming that slavery diminished their chances to earn decent wages. He was not at all interested in religious motivations to end slavery. As a result, abolitionists such as John G. Fee prevented the American Missionary Society from sending funds to Bailey after his newspaper press was burned out by arson. Bailey later traveled to New England and England seeking funds to restart his presses .

Some of the national antislavery newspapers found a few subscribers in Ky., especially in the cities; however most of their influence was through the antislavery societies in Ohio and Ind. The truth was that the Ky. educational system was so poor in quality that few yeomen could read or write. Ironically, it was the landed gentry, the slaveholders that educated their children.

Despite the fact that Abraham Lincoln’s had been born in Ky., his candidacy for president in 1860, seen as being antislavery and anti-southern by his critics, was immensely unpopular in Northern Kentucky. All three of the other candidates out polled the Republican Lincoln in Ky. . The old line Whig constituencies tended to favor John Bell, the Constitutional Unionist from Tenn., while the Democratic vote split in Ky. with native-son John C. Breckinridge, the Southern Democrat, picking up the old Andrew Jacksonites and Stephen Douglas of Ill., the Northern Democrat, the national Democratic vote. Only in the urban communities of Covington and Newport did Lincoln poll respectable numbers in Northern Kentucky in the 1860 election. Just across the Ohio River, both Ohio and Ind. gave major support to the election of Abraham Lincoln and the new Republican Party ticket.

Northern Kentucky’s Antislavery Vote in 1860

 

County

 

Potential

Vote

1860

Republican

  1. Lincoln
1860

Constitutional Union

John Bell

1860

Independent Democrat (South)

  1. Breckinridge
1860

Democrat

(North)

  1. Douglas
 

Percent Voting

Boone 2,409 1 881 228 739 77.2%
Bracken 2,358 4 881 246 644 75.3%
Campbell 5,125 314 854 960 520 51.7%
Carroll 1,352 0 436 76 572 79.7%
Gallatin 1,018 0 383 34 420 82.2%
Grant 1,742 0 677 112 709 86.0%
Kenton 6,170 267 1327 1312 670 57.6%
Mason 3,468 26 1305 247 799 58.5%
Owen 2,468 0 539 43 1760 94.9%
Pendleton 2,252 2 758 231 807 79.8%
Robertson NA NA NA NA NA NA

Source: Shannon and McQuown, Presidential Politics in Kentucky 1824—1948.

Four years later in 1864, with Ky. under military occupation, with rumors afloat that the Union Army was proposing enlisting black slaves and freedmen, and with many Kentuckians serving in Confederate Army units, the total vote in the state was suppressed significantly. Differences within the region were exaggerated in the 1864 election. Although McClelland won Ky. by a margin of two to one, Lincoln actually won in Kenton and in Campbell counties, albeit with a suspicious and remarkable 107% of eligible voters. By 1864, the overwhelming issues centered on the individual voter’s position in regard to supporting the Union or Confederacy as well as resentment toward Ky.’s continued treatment as a hostile region under military rule. A vote in Ky. for or against Abraham Lincoln now centered more on current political issues and the importance of the antislavery movement in Ky. had been eclipsed in the wake.

Northern Kentucky’s Presidential Vote in 1864

 

County

 

Potential

Vote

1864

Union

A/ Lincoln

1864

Democrat

General McClellan

 

Percent Voting

Boone 2,385 200 1063 53.0%
Bracken 2,506 268 922 47.5%
Campbell 2,597 1504 1286 107.4%
Carroll 1,408 82 324 28.8%
Gallatin 994 109 391 50.3%
Grant 2,022 220 373 29.3%
Kenton 6,990 1716 1375 44.2%
Mason 3,412 368 1197 45.9%
Owen 2,648 0 0 0
Pendleton 2,492 629 688 52.8%
Robertson NA NA NA NA
Soldiers Vote* 1194 2823

                   Note: Robertson not formed yet and Soldier’s Vote was statewide tally

REPOSITION THIS TABLE.

Bryant, James C. Mountain Island in Owen County, Kentucky, The Settlers and Their Churches. Owenton, Ky.: Owen County Historical Society, 1986.

Drummond, Dwight Lowell. Antislavery: The Crusade for Freedom in America. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1961.

Harrison, Lowell H. The Antislavery Movement in Kentucky. Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky, 1978.

 

Howard, Victor B. The Evangelical War against Slavery and Caste, the Life and Times of John G. Fee, Selinsgrove, Penn.: Susquehanna University Press, 1996.

LaRoche, Cheryl Jenifer. “On the Edge of Freedom: Free Black Communities, Archaeology, and the Underground Railroad,” Ph.D. diss., University of Maryland, 2006.

Martin, Asa Earl. “Pioneer Antislavery Press,” Missouri Valley Historical Review, 2 (March 1916): 510–528.

Nowlin, William Dudley, Kentucky Baptist History 1790–1922. Louisville: Baptist Book Concern, 1922.

Ripley, C. Peter. ed. The Black Abolitionist Papers, III, IV and V. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1991.

Shannon Jasper B., and Ruth McQuown. Presidential Politics in Kentucky 1824–1948. Lexington: Bureau of Government Research, College of Arts and Sciences, University of Kentucky, 1930.

Sparks, Elder John. The Roots of Appalachian Christianity, Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2001.

Spencer, J.H. History of Kentucky Baptists from 1769 to 1865. Lafayette, Tenn.: Church History Research & Archives, 1976

Tallant, Harold D. Evil Necessity, Slavery and Political Culture in Antebellum Kentucky. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 2003.

Turner, Wallace B. “Abolitionism in Kentucky,” RKHS, 69 (October 1971): 319–338.

 

Diane Perrine Coon

Henry Bibb Project Research Report

Detail of surface survey Gatewood site Aug 27, 2005 copy

 Henry Bibb National Heritage Trail: William Gatewood Farm,

Bedford, Trimble County, Kentucky

Initial work on the William Gatewood plantation where Henry Bibb escaped from slavery in 1831 was funded by a grant from the Kentucky Heritage Council. The study included an archaeological survey that has been extended as a public archaeological educaiton site for the next 8 years under the auspices of Jeannine Kreinbrink. The second part of the intial study included a comprehensive search by local historians for documents relating to the birth, ownership, land and tax records, and roadways involved in the life of Henry Bibb. Using Bibb’s well-known autobiography as an initial source, the historicans plowed through court and land records to support or change the information in the book. The third part included a major supplement for teachers using the Henry Bibb autobiography for study of American slavery and a unique set of escapes. One major part of the education section was an original one-act play by Carrider Jones which was produced at the Actors Theatre in Louisville.

Gatewood Plantation House March 2005 copy

Here is the text from the research report portion of the report to the Kentucky Heritage Council as grant provider.

Project Report 2 1

 

Project Report 2 6 Gatewood site map

 

Project Report 2 2

 

Project Report 2 3

 

Project Report 2 4

Project Report 2 5Dot Carrico with team surface artifact search Aug 27, 2005

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hoagland Family

This article minus the photographs appeared in the Northern Kentucky Enclyclopedia, published by University Press of Kentucky in 2009.

Cornelius Hoagland, pioneer, Hunter’s Bottom, Kentucky

he Hoagland family were among the early settlers of Hunter’s Bottom, Ky., in Carroll Co. Cornelius Hoagland was the fourth generation of a Dutch immigrant family who in 1657 came from Harlaam, Holland, to New Amsterdam (N.Y., N.Y.) Cornelius was born in 1750 on a farm along the Millstone River in Windsor, Middlesex Co., N.J. He was the fourth son of Martinus and Phoebe Van Okie Hoagland. In 1776, four of the Hoagland brothers—John, Martin, Cornelius and Abraham—volunteered for service in the N.J. militia. Martin became a Captain, and their uncle Okey Hoagland became a Major.

Light Dragoons
George Washington’s Light Dragoons

In early 1777, Capt. Cornelius Hoagland organized N.J.’s only mounted horse troop at Middlebrook. His unit, along with four mounted horse troops from Conn. and one from Mass., became the elite Second Light Dragoons Regiment, under the command of Elisha Sheldon. The Dragoons excelled at reconnaissance and at General George Washington’s insistance they cross-trained with saber and with rifle as mounted infantry. Operating most frequently in small groups, the Second Light Dragoons staged numerous harassment raids and supply ambushes throughout N.J., Conn., and upstate N.Y. Frequently, the Dragoons acted as bodyguards for General Washington, covered retreats of the army, and at Valley Forge, Pa., they patrolled the perimeter. The Second Light Dragoons were the last unit dismissed from service by General Washington at West Point, N. Y. on November 20, 1783.

Jacob Ford Mansion, Morristown, NJ

Jacob Ford Mansion, Morristown, New Jersey

Capt. Cornelius Hoagland was stationed at Morristown, N. J., in the winter and early spring of 1776–1777. On May 15, 1777, he married Mary Tuttle, daughter of Captain Moses Tuttle, of Mt. Pleasant, northwest of Whippany, N.J. Tuttle was the owner of a famous iron mine that produced cannon and shot for the colonies’ war effort. The Tuttle family had arrived in Boston, Mass., in 1635, about the same time the Hoaglands came to New Amsterdam, and were prominent members of society in Conn . The original Yale University buildings in N. J. were erected on William Tuttle’s land near the New Haven green. Mary Tuttle, through her mother, was related to the large Ford family; her uncle Jacob Ford’s home in Morristown served as Gen. George Washington’s headquarters in the winter of 1779–1780, and Mary attended dances and social events there.

 

 

 

Immediately following the war, Cornelius joined his father-in-law in running the iron business. Together, they expanded the enterprise which included the original mine, forges, and mills. Cornelius and his brother-in-law Charles Hoff, on March 15, 1781 entered land surveys for 1,000 acres each along the Ohio River in what became Hunter’s Bottom, Ky. A series of financial panics in the mid and late 1780s nearly bankrupted the Tuttle iron business and prevented Hoagland from exercising his use of the Ky. lands until 1797.

Between 1778 and 1798, the first nine children of Cornelius and Mary were born in Windsor, Middlesex Co. In 1793, Cornelius Hoagland paid taxes in Pequannok, Morris Co., N. J. Apparently Hoagland was working through his debts, because he served as carpenter for the Peter Ogden estate in Morristown; Ogden, a relative of the Tuttles, served as N.J. representative and participated in approving the U. S. Constitution.

The lure of open lands in the West continued to attract Cornelius Hoagland and his family. Cornelius Hoagland and his eldest son, Moses, came to Ky. in 1797, entered the survey in the Ky. land records, and cleared this land. They returned to N.J., and Cornelius sold his property there. In 1801, Cornelius brought the entire family—Mary and eight children, and his sister Anna, to Hunter’s Bottom. His older brother, Martin Hoagland, settled in Lexington, Ky., that same year. Cornelius and his sons built a low, one-story, rambling house. Indian mounds were located on the property. George Rodgers Clark is said to have stayed overnight at the Hoagland home. Cornelia and Emily Hoagland were born in Hunter’s Bottom in 1800 and 1803, respectively.

In 1801, upon the recommendation of Presley Gray, Lieutenant. Colonel of the Fifty-first Regiment, Ky. Governor James Garrard (1796–1804) appointed Cornelius Hoagland a Major in the regiment; Hoagland resigned that commission late in 1802.  Cornelius Hoagland replaced Presley Gray as assistant judge of the local circuit court on February 25, 1805. The Ky. circuit of the court’s chief justice, Cary L. Clarke, included Boone, Campbell, Gallatin, Harrison, Pendleton, and Scott counties.

While returning from a court session in Port William, Ky. in July 1806, Cornelius Hoagland stopped to view work being done to clear land, was struck by a burning tree limb, and died at fifty-six, leaving Mary to raise eleven children in the wilderness. Cultured and educated, Mary Tuttle Hoagland is said to have educated several of the neighborhood children, in addition to her own. Her stories of the events she witnessed firsthand during the Revolutionary War, and especially stories of George Washington, were part of the lore and legend of Hunter’s Bottom. A land partition in 1806 divided the Hoagland farm into twelve equal parts, each child and the widow receiving about one hundred acres. Mary died in February 1836, and was buried at Hunter’s Bottom.

The Hoagland family’s eldest son, Moses Tuttle Hoagland, followed in his father’s footsteps, serving in the Ky. Militia’s Second Regiment Mounted Volunteers during the War of 1812. The family history claimed that Moses served on the staff of Gen. Andrew Jackson and was given a battlefield command as a Major at the Battle of New Orleans in January 1815, but there is no validating muster list. He married Sarah Paine (Payne) of Lexington, and lived at Hunter’s Bottom. Okey Hoagland, an attorney that speculated in land both in Ind. and Ky., bought portions of the Hoagland family’s lands from his sister, Delia Morris, and his brother, Martin, who moved west. Okey, who became lame and later blind, constructed what was later known as the Hampton House, a square-set house with a center corridor from architectural plans he acquired while in N.J. Two girls from the Hoagland family, Mary Caroline and Emily, married sons of John Conway, another early Hunter’s Bottom settler, and descendents of the Conway family members who continue to live at Hunter’s Bottom on farms. Jane Hoagland (?) married William White and he built them a home at Hunter’s Bottom that still stands.

Carpenter, Daniel Hoagland. History and Genealogy of the Hoagland Family in America. (Place of publication: publisher; date?)

Hampton, Ella. TM, “Early Settlers in Hunters Bottom,” 1965.

Hoagland, George William. Dirck Jansen Hoogland Family History 1657–1976, Genie Reprint, 1976.

Memoirs of the Lower Ohio Valley, Volume I. (author, place of publication, publisher, date?)

U.S. Treasury Warrants 2014, 2015 for 1,000 acres on the Ohio River, Ky. Survey No. 2341 filed November 3, 1797. (where?)

Database: Early African-American Congregations

Early African-American Congregations

in North Central Kentucky

 

Before the Civil War

 

  1. White Churches, with Large or Prominent Slave Populations

 

Photo Year Congregation City County Notes
1770 St. Paul’s Methodist Paris Bourbon Claims to be first Methodist Church in KY
1783 Methodist Society Harrodsburg Mercer An early Methodist center with slave members
1789 Methodist Society Lexington Fayette Short & Deweese, small log building
1789 Coloured Charge of Lexington Circuit Lexington Fayette Later became Old Branch Church, Old Mill Church, Asbury, and Gunn, Wesley Methodist
1790 Methodist Society Port William Carroll Then Gallatin County; Bishop Asbury stayed overnight in 1808; First church 1809. In 1824 the George Boorom Class had four slaves.
1790 First Methodist Frankfort Franklin 1821:28White and 31 Black members
1790 First Baptist Lexington Fayette
1797 Harrod’s Creek Baptist Harrods Creek Jefferson Claims to be first African-American Baptist Church in the area
1799 Drennon’s Creek Baptist New Castle Henry Became First Baptist, New Castle
1799 Christiansburg Baptist Christiansburg Shelby Men listed first, women and slaves last
Yes 1801 Drennon’s Colored Meeting Place New Castle Henry Now Main Street Baptist; Rev. Alex Taylor; separate site; where Elijah P. Marrs received his certificate to preach.
Yes 1803 Corn Creek Baptist Above Milton Trimble Slaves 19% of congregation by 1831
1804 Versailles Methodist Versailles Woodford “Uncle Isaac” a slave introduced Methodism to Versailles; part of the initial Lexington Circuit
1808 Mt. Olivet Baptist Pendleton Henry Richard and Miss Lucy prominent slaves
Yes 1811 Plum Creek Baptist Waterford Spencer
1812 Johnson Meeting House Mercer On Munday’s Landing Road, N.E. area of Mercer and 2 miles from KY River; later Joseph’s Chapel nearby.
1816 First Baptist Frankfort Franklin
Yes 1816 First Presbyterian Shelbyville Shelby 3 Galleries for Slaves
1818 Buck Run Baptist Woodlake Franklin
1818 Six-Mile Baptist Shelby Over 50 Black members
1818 Hopewell Baptist Lacie Henry A large slave part of congregation
Yes 1819 Clay Street Baptist Shelbyville Shelby 1840s – 143 Black: 290 Total;

1854 – 181 Black: 309 Total

1819 White’s Run Baptist Carroll A few slaves
1820 St. Paul’s Mission Lexington Fayette Methodist mission became St. Paul’s A.M.E. and in 1891 Quinn A.M.E.
c 1820 Washington M.E. Washington Mason 90 Blacks, no White
1825 Black Burying Grounds Little Mount Spencer Members of Little Mount Baptist
1827 Versailles Methodist Versailles Woodford Building completed
1828 First Presbyterian Lawrenceburg Anderson Slaves had full membership

 

 

  1. Separated “Colored” Services/Churches
  2. Year Congregation City County Notes
    1829 The African Church Louisville Jefferson Became Fifth Street Baptist in 1844; original Baptist mission to slaves in Louisville, 1815
    Yes 1830 Carrollton Methodist Carrollton Carroll South end of brick church on Highland Avenue had stairway leading to gallery where Negro members were seated.
    Yes 1830s Colored Church Simpsonville Shelby Now First Greater Baptist; in 1851 Rev. Charles Wells, in 1864 Rev. Sandy Bullitt and Deacon John Bullitt
    1830s Methodist Teacher Bedford Trimble Miss Davis taught Henry Bibb and others to read until stopped by the patrols
    Yes 1832 Jackson Street M.E. Louisville Jefferson Originally met in Old Frog Pond Church in early 1830s.
    1832 Colored Baptist Church Louisville Jefferson Market Street, between 7th & 8th
    Yes 1833 First Baptist Frankfort Franklin Founded by Free Blacks in Frankfort.
    Yes 1833 First Baptist Jeffersontown Jefferson Reverend Henry Adams came out from Louisville to found a separate Black congregation from among the members of the Union Church. A log meeting house was erected c. 1850 on the corner of Watterson Trail and the Taylorsville Road. A larger frame church was built c. 1900 and a still larger one in 1976.
    1837 Asbury M.E. Lexington Fayette Mother Church of Lexington Conference
    1838 Bethel House of God Louisville Jefferson 2nd & Main across from old Galt House; became Quinn Chapel A.M.E., mother church for A.M.E. in the area.
    Yes 1839 St. John A.M.E. Frankfort Franklin Formed chiefly by numerous Free Blacks in Frankfort.
    Yes 1839 Jackson Street M.E. Louisville Jefferson
    Yes 1839 Zion Hill Methodist Bethlehem Henry Black velvet rope separated
    1839 Ninth Street M.E. Covington Kenton
    Yes 1840 Second Baptist Campbellsburg Henry Separate slave church building. Members came from as far away as Sulphur, Port Royal, and New Castle.
    1840 Hill Street Methodist Lexington Fayette Large anti-slavery contingent broke away in 1866 to form Centenary as an M.E. Church; In 1858 congregation had 219 White and 570 Black; KY average was only 28% Black.
    1841 First African-American School in Louisville Louisville Jefferson Rev. Henry Adams, African Baptist, moved to Fifth Street Baptist in 1864
    Yes 1842 LaGrange M.E. LaGrange Oldham Some slaves members; Preachers on circuit by 1840; never more than two colored members listed officially. Led to formation of the Second Methodist Church on Adam Street, Kynett Church..
    1842 African Baptist Harrodsburg Mercer
    Yes 1842 Plum Creek Colored Baptists Waterford Spencer Separate services, 3rd Sunday, two elders to report disorderly conduct
    1843 Hopewell Baptist Lacie Henry Edmund to conduct separate services for slaves 2nd Sunday in church; permitted to baptize
    Yes 1844 First Baptist Church Frankfort Franklin Clinton & High Street
    1845 Fifth Street Baptist Louisville Jefferson
    1846 Pleasant View Baptist Mountain Island Owen Colored services, 3rd Sundays
    Yes 1846 Little Vine Church Goshen Oldham Served the Goshen, Skylight (Oldhamburg) and part of Brownsboro district.
    1846 Green Street Baptist Danville Boyle Now First Baptist
    c. 1850 New Liberty Baptist New Liberty Owen Separate slave church building
    c. 1850 Methodist Class Simpsonville Shelby E. P. Marrs attended class
    1850s Center Street M.E.-South Louisville Jefferson A.M.E. Zion 1866 KY Conference formed; Bishop Miles won court case to take Center back to C.M.E
    1850s Green Street M.E.-South Louisville Jefferson M.E. – South
    1850s Jackson Street M.E. – South Louisville Jefferson M.E. – South
    Yes 1852 Negro Methodists Carrollton Carroll Brick building on Sycamore Street given to Negro members for Sunday services; also a school from 1852-1859 taught by Lizzie Dowling. Building used until 1890s when Second Methodist was built on Eighth Street.
    1853 First Baptist Versailles Woodford
    Yes 1853 Shiloh Baptist Scott Station Shelby Old Harrington Mill White Church moved to Antioch Rd
    1855 Green Street Baptist Louisville Jefferson From Walnut Street Baptist
    1857 First Baptist Paris Bourbon
    1858 Cottontown Methodist East Paris Bourbon Now St. Paul’s M.E.
    1860 Evergreen Baptist Lawrenceburg Anderson
    Yes 1860 Elk Creek Missionary Baptist Spencer North section of Spencer near Shelby County
    Yes 1860 Clay Street Baptist Shelbyville Shelby Purchased Lots 54 & 55
    Yes 1860s Colored Methodists Simpsonville Shelby First Street
    1860s Buck Run Baptist Shelby 128 Blacks separate from Buck Run Baptist Church. Most of the rural churches in Shelby County had a large slave population. (See St. John A.M.E.)


 

  1. Free Black Churches, Civil War and Post-War

 

Year Congregation City County Notes
1864 First Baptist Covington Kenton
Yes 1865 First Baptist Eminence Henry The congregation goes back into the formation of Eminence as a town on the railroad tracks. After the Civil War, the congregation separated and built its own building on the south side of Eminence.
Yes 1865 Kynett Methodist LaGrange Oldham Often called the “Colored Methodist” Church. Founded out of the old M.E. South Church at LaGrange; named for Alpha Jefferson Kynett of the Board of Church Extension. Complete union as Covenant U.M.C. in 1996. Called a woman to teach the Methodist children in 1869, paid in part with Freedman’s Bureau funds.
1866 Lampton Missionary

Baptist

Louisville Jefferson
Yes 1866 Second Baptist Taylorsville Spencer Served the former slave population on the upper Salt River at Taylorsville, the county seat of Spencer County. The old church building has been preserved next to the new building.
Yes 1867 Bethel A.M.E. Shelbyville Shelby Rev. W. D. Certain, Rev. H. C. Ashley; grew out of the substantial African-American Methodist population at Shelbyville. Located in the old “Stray Pen” lot where stray pigs and cattle were kept next to the first jail in Shelbyville.
1867 Centennial Baptist Hinesville Shelby Still an active congregation located north of Shelbyville on the railroad tracks at Hinesville.
Yes c. 1867 Second Baptist Warsaw Gallatin This congregation goes back to the earliest settlement of Gallatin County and was separated from the White Baptists after the Civil War. They purchased the old Christian Church and are still an active congregation.
1869 First Convention Colored

Baptists

Louisville KY 12 of 17 congregations represented; 1869 –

55 churches and 12,620 members

Yes 1868 First Baptist Pewee Valley Oldham Founded after the Civil War to serve the African-

American community at Stumptown on the old

Floydsburg Road on the west side of Pewee Valley.

These former slaves became servants at the big

houses in Pewee Valley. After the Ford plant was

built, this became a prosperous community and a

new building was added to the grounds.

1869 First Convention Colored Methodists Harrodsburg Mercer Christian Methodists (C.M.E.) and Lexington

Conference of M.E. emerged

1869 Second Christian Church Lawrenceburg Anderson
1869 Fifteenth Street A.M.E. Louisville Jefferson Now Young’s Chapel; Split to form Twelfth Street

now Broadway Temple

1869 Negro Baptist Mt. Gilead Fayette
Yes 1869 St. John C.M.E. Shelbyville Shelby This was the largest “Negro” congregation in Shelbyville when it built a white frame building on College Street from 1887-1897. Since then the congregation split into the Congregational Methodists and the United Methodists. The African-American Methodists were nurtured by Reverend John Tevis, a staunch anti-slavery pastor.
1869 Simpson C.M.E. Black Hills Woodford Versailles area
1871 Calvary C.M.E. Louisville Jefferson
Yes 1871 Second Baptist Ghent Carroll Given permission to set up separate church from the

Ghent Baptist Church; soon afterwards built their

own church building on Liberty Street.

Yes 1871 Sycamore Chapel

Methodist

Fraziertown Oldham Building says M.E., but probably C.M.E.
1872 New Hope Baptist Louisville Jefferson
1872 Zion Hill Baptist Scott
1872 New Coke C.M.E. Louisville Jefferson
Yes 1874 First Baptist Anchorage Jefferson
Yes 1875 Muir Chapel C.M.E. Eastwood Jefferson Still listed as C.M.E.
Yes 1876 St. John’s A.M.E. Christiansburg Shelby Congregation part of a large slave population

around Christiansburg. Active until 1968.

Yes 1876 First Corinthian Baptist Frankfort Franklin Originally located in The Craw, next to the

Kentucky River. After urban renewal devastated

that area, the church moved to serve the southside

population nearest the new State Capitol.

Yes 1876 Allen Chapel C.M.E. Finchville Shelby Congregation goes way back as part of the White

Methodists in the area. James Allen, who

emancipated his own slaves, organized the

congregation and donated the land and money to

help build the chapel. Patsy Allen, who married

Chapman Harris, a leader of the U.G.R.R. at

Madison, Indiana, and her brother James Allen

were emancipated by the Allen family in the mid

1830s.

Yes 1870s Colored Methodist Church Warsaw Gallatin
1870s Lick Creek Area Baptist Sparta Gallatin
1870a Colored Baptist Ripyville Anderson Joined to form Sand Spring Baptist, met at

schoolhouse

Yes 1870s Taylortown A.M.E. Zion Taylortown Jefferson On Ballardsville Road, east of Louisville; served a

large rural area from Westport Road to U.S. 42.

Yes 1870s Greencastle Baptist Prospect Jefferson Located on Rose Island Road. Served the Prospect

and western Goshen area, that had a heavy slave

population before the Civil War. Little Vine served

the eastern section of Goshen. A small mission used

to be on the Ohio River as well.

1870s Salt River Baptist Anderson Joined to form Sand Spring
1870s Ebenezer M.E. Cynthiana Harrison